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Cowboy Stuntman: From Olympic Gold to the Silver Screen$29.95
Cowboy Stuntman: From Olympic Gold to the Silver Screen
Dean Smith has taken falls from galloping horses, engaged in fistfights with Kirk Douglas and George C. Scott, donned red wig and white tights to double Maureen O’Hara, and taught Goldie Hawn how to talk like a Texan. He’s dangled from a helicopter over the skyscrapers of Manhattan while clutching a damsel in distress, hung upside down from a fake blimp 200 feet over the Orange Bowl, and replicated one of the most famous scenes in movie history by climbing on a thundering team of horses to stop a runaway stagecoach. Cowboy Stuntman chronicles the life and achievements of this colorful Texan and Olympic gold medal winner who spent a half century as a Hollywood stuntman and actor, appearing in ten John Wayne movies and doubling for a long list of actors as diverse as Robert Culp, Michael Landon, Steve Martin, Strother Martin, Robert Redford, and Roy Rogers.     Review The life story of Dean Smith reads like a Mark Twain novel; a wishful, determined, small-town boy grows up and makes good. Along the way he sets college records, wins an Olympic gold medal, plays professional football, and then accomplishes his greatest ambition of all: he becomes a motion picture and television stuntman. . . . Dean’s story is one of incredible achievement and tells us that indeed dreams can come true. --James Garner Dean ran so fast you couldn’t photograph him. We had to slow him down just to get the shot.  His book takes me back to the glory days of living and making westerns in Hollywood. It is exciting, humorous, and action packed, a darn good read. I've never had a better friend. --Dale Robertson   Dean Smith's career as a real Cowboy turned Hollywood stuntman is wonderfully portrayed in this page-turner. I am proud to know a man of such talent and grit. His achievements and exploits will give readers much enjoyment and appreciation for a now bygone era of movie history in America. --Bob Lilly   I've known Dean Smith for almost thirty years. He has led an interesting and varied career. Known and respected in the movie business as a top stunt man and a versatile character actor, he is also a man of his word. Somebody to ride the river with! --Barry Corbin   Dean Smith is the perfect image of a Texas gentlemen and consummate professional. His unbelievably varied life has held many uplifting moments that helped make him one of the grandest men I have ever known. I know that you will enjoy the stories of his life. —Red Steagall
Who Was That Masked Man? The Story of the Lone Ranger$16.95
Who Was That Masked Man? The Story of the Lone Ranger
Who Was That Masked Man? The Story of the Lone Ranger by David Rothel (Author)   Who Was That Masked Man? The Story of the Lone Ranger" chronicles the creation and development of the Lone Ranger during the Depression years of the early 1930s on radio and in novels, comic strips and two movie serials. It examines the promotion of the character through radio premiums and merchandising from the 1930s to the present. More that 150 photographs—many of them rare behind the scenes from the early radio days—stimulate visual memories. The book includes reminiscences by members of the radio “stock company,” both actors and others; actors and directors from the television show, as well as the feature films.   About the Author Author David Rothel’s lifelong fascination with show business began with frequent visits to the three movie theatres in Elyria, Ohio, where he was intrigued and inspired by what he saw on the silver screen. He has since gone from youthful observer to published authority on various aspects of popular entertainment, all of which is reflected in his thirteen books on show business history. In addition to being an educator and theatre producer/director through the years, from the 1970s through 2003, David interviewed dozens of show business personalities for his radio program Nostalgia Newsbreak in Florida, and for “Guest Star” panels at film festivals where he was the moderator. David’s fascination with the western film genre caused him to research and write books on many of the leading stars of those films. He had the opportunity to personally interview Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, and other leading and supporting players for his books. David’s book on western film locations, An Ambush of Ghosts: a Personal Guide to Favorite Western Film Locations was twice featured on Leonard Maltin segments on Entertainment Tonight. His book The Singing Cowboys led to an appearance on NPR’s All Things Considered. The BBC’s Omnibus television series featured David’s book The Great Show Business Animals on one of its programs. In 2012 David Rothel received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Williamsburg Film Festival for “His Dedication and Outstanding Contributions in Honoring the Golden Age of Hollywood.” David and his wife Nancy live in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in Dahlonega, Georgia.     The Musuem is now celebrating the 75th anniversary of The Lone Ranger's silver screen premiere in Republic Pictures 1938 serial THE LONE RANGER Exhibit_Click_Here_2   CLICK ON EITHER IMAGE   LR_WEB_EXHIBIT   Over 400 items on display
The Thoughts & Customs of the American Indian$12.95
The Thoughts & Customs of the American Indian
  JimPhillips worked as a missionary to his people for several years and this is a set of lessons that he put together for other Native Americans. It was so popular that he decided to put this booklet together for all to read and study. It has touched many lives and people have said it is one of the most deeply spiritual books ever printed.Veronica Flood ,niece of John Fire "Lame Deer" said" This is the most accurate book I have ever seen written about the life of the Lakotah people. Even the words are spelled correctly". This is truly an Introduction to the Thoughts and Customs of the Native American. Some of these stories are great to use as illustrations in sermons and Bible lessons. Here are a few words that Wayne from the United Kingdon had to say about this little book"Dear Mr.Traveling Dog On a recent trip to the Western states I happened across your book in a small gift shop in Lone Pine, Ca. Among all the other books large and small, this one seemed to leap out at me when I briefly glanced through it. I realized straight away it was something special.-I found some answers to many of my questions about the American Indian in your fine book and I am simply writing to tell you thank you your words touched me deeply-I will treasure them forever."  In Oct.& Nov. 2007 It was one of the top selling books of the week at Russo's Books in Bakersfield, California.  48 Pages Paperback   About the Author: Dr. James M. Phillips is recognized worldwide as a scholar and leading authority on Biblical Languages, Church History, and Biblical Doctrines. To read more about Dr. Philips and his teachings please see - http://discovertheword.com   Dr. Philips is an avid amateur radio operator and communincates with wide range of fans. See QRZ.com     Many people have pestered me about writing something on QRZ about myself especially Bruce KE7LGD. So here it goes. Hi my name is Jim N7IU. I got my 7 callsign when I lived in Fishlake Valley where I grew up there in the 50's and 60's. I have lived there for about 30 years of my live and even though I don't live there now I left my heart there.I love the mountains and the many wonderful sights in and around that valley. I was a Volunteer Examiner in the Bishop and Nevada areaand gave manyham tests and had many get togethers at my QTH in Fishlake Valley. My mother Faye is a ham KF6HUI. My wife Marilyn KG6TBO, my son Gary KD6QMS, and daughter Dakotah KI6KIW are all hamstersI got into ham radio in 1961 and have loved radio all of my life. I listened to short wave as a child and loved to work on radios and build electronic kits. I was so shy when I first got into radio that I never talked for years but once I got started I made up for lost time. I have taught history,political science, western civilization, Koine Greek, BiblicalHebrewand love and teach U S history and the Old West History. I was spokesman for the American Indian Counselin Bakersfield California for several years and have lectured on Native American culture in California , Nevada, Texas and Oklahoma. I am of Native American descent Cherokee,Lakotah, Dakotah, Chickasaw and Ojibwaand 1/32 Scotts from Smith Paul founder of Pauls Valley Oklahoma. I have written over 100 books and love to write and teach about the Bible, Church history, American Indian culture and philosophy.There are two websites on the world wide web with books that I have written and hundreds of classes that I have taught, discoverthewordwithdrjim.com and sermonaudio.com/dtw Randall Vanden Hoek the webmaster maintains them. About 30 years ago I was invited to become part of the 3913 bunch by Jesse NO9Pand have been there ever since. In the evenings. Ed K9HSS and I occassionally tell stories which many of the listeners seem to love. Itell stories about my numerous crazy and wild adventuresof hunting and fishing in the wilds of the mountains and the ocean. I have occassionally been known to talk about my great great grand father Sam Paul and his exciting adventures as an Indian Marshal in Indian Territory and our families very exciting business adventures in Lincoln County, New Mexico, and my families part in the Lincoln County war ON THE GOOD SIDE with Billy the Kid. 73 for now and I hope to hear and talk to you on 3913 lsb in the evenings or 7.220 lsb around noon in the day time. Jim November 7 Indians United.
Joel McCrea: A Film History$18.99
Joel McCrea: A Film History
t is doubtful if any film actor has ever summed up a long career more modestly, more succinctly or more accurately than Joel McCrea: “I did the best I could without trying too hard.” In view of his having starred in eighty films over a thirty-year period during what is generally regarded as Hollywood’s Golden Age, it is a remarkably modest summation. His is an extraordinary filmography, one that has seldom been given much attention, possibly because McCrea himself was a man who never sought much attention. If it was his wish to avoid attention, he was successful because he is the most underrated of all the male stars of that Golden Age. His contemporaries—Gary Cooper, Clark Gable, James Stewart, John Wayne, Cary Grant, Spencer Tracy, James Cagney, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart—have all been well assessed. Hopefully, this biographical essay and comprehensive filmography by author and film historian Tony Thomas will serve to remind us of the significant contributions of Joel McCrea.   292 Pages     JoelMcCrea_Foundation_LogoThe Joel and Frances McCrea Ranch Foundation was formed in order to assist in the fundraising efforts to honor and preserve the legacy of Joel and Frances McCrea by raising and managing funds to support the Conejo Recreation and Park District in the restoration, preservation and rehabilitation, as well as the interpretive and educational programs of the Joel and Frances McCrea Ranch. Click image to learn more.
Lone Pine in the Movies: Where the Real West Becomes the Reel West$12.95
Lone Pine in the Movies: Where the Real West Becomes the Reel West
  Like its predecessors, the 2013 edition of Lone Pine in the Movies examines vintage films made in and around this sleepy little town nestled among the foothills of California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, in the shadow of majestic Mount Whitney. This all-Westerns issue features a handful of in-depth articles, all profusely illustrated with portraits, scene stills, and poster reproductions from the horse operas under discussion. In an extensive interview, Don Murray (Marilyn Monroe's leading man in Bus Stop) opens up about his long career and especially his offbeat 1958 Western, From Hell to Texas, which was shot in Lone Pine. Another lengthy piece chronicles the making of three classic Randolph Scott oaters written by Burt Kennedy and directed by Budd Boetticher: The Tall T, Ride Lonesome, and Comanche Station. Hopalong Cassidy's first boy sidekick, 12-year-old rodeo star Billy King, reminisces about his trio of 1937-38 Hoppy pictures filmed in the area. Other articles explore the Lone Pine productions of "B"-Western stars Tom Tyler and Jack Randall. The issue ends with a portfolio of then-and-now photos in which Los Angeles Times lenser Don Kelsen matches old movie stills with new shots taken on the same spots for comparison purposes. This handsomely printed journal sports a glossy wraparound cover and offers more than a hundred pages and just as many illustrations. (104 Pages)     Click here to Preview this Edition: Comin
Cowboy Sidekicks$25.00
Cowboy Sidekicks
Those Great Cowboy Sidekicks is an in-depth examination of such fondly remembered comic character actors as George "Gabby" Hayes,Smiley Burnette, Andy Devine, Al "Fuzzy" St. John, Pat Buttram, and many other sidekicks of the B Westerns-thirty-nine in all! Much of Those Great Cowboy Sidekicks is told through the reminiscences of the sidekicks themselves (those who are still kicking) and the cowboy stars who enjoyed the company of these often bewhiskered, tobacco-chewing saddle pals. Author David Rothel interviewed many of the top Western stars, sidekicks, heroines, directors, writers, relatives, and Gower Gulch extras in his effort to tell the story of these comic actors. Mr. Rothel also provides the reader with the rare opportunity to go behind the scenes to discover the manner in which Western screen comedy was created. (It wasn't all just falling into horse troughs, you may be sure!)  Revised publication from Lone Pine Film History Publishing Group.   About the Author Author David Rothel’s lifelong fascination with show business began with frequent visits to the three movie theatres in Elyria, Ohio, where he was intrigued and inspired by what he saw on the silver screen. He has since gone from youthful observer to published authority on various aspects of popular entertainment, all of which is reflected in his thirteen books on show business history. In addition to being an educator and theatre producer/director through the years, from the 1970s through 2003, David interviewed dozens of show business personalities for his radio program Nostalgia Newsbreak in Florida, and for “Guest Star” panels at film festivals where he was the moderator. David’s fascination with the western film genre caused him to research and write books on many of the leading stars of those films. He had the opportunity to personally interview Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, and other leading and supporting players for his books. David’s book on western film locations, An Ambush of Ghosts: a Personal Guide to Favorite Western Film Locations was twice featured on Leonard Maltin segments on Entertainment Tonight. His book The Singing Cowboys led to an appearance on NPR’s All Things Considered. The BBC’s Omnibus television series featured David’s book The Great Show Business Animals on one of its programs. In 2012 David Rothel received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Williamsburg Film Festival for “His Dedication and Outstanding Contributions in Honoring the Golden Age of Hollywood.” David and his wife Nancy live in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in Dahlonega, Georgia.
Arches of the Alabamas$12.99
Arches of the Alabamas
  The Alabama Hills are found just to the west of the small town of Lone Pine, California. Most people would agree that they exhibit an extraordinary beauty with unique rock formations, stunning skylines, and the backdrop of the majestic High Sierras. It is no wonder that the film industry has repeatedly chosen this location for so many movies. However, hidden within the rocks, there is another often overlooked natural treasure, the arches of the Alabama Hills. There are reportedly over 300 of these geologic structures in the area. This guidebook provides a means to locate 72 of the more accessible ones, as well as 23 other features, by providing GPS coordinates, descriptions, color photos, and maps that can be readily used in the field. The arches can be found using just the maps but a GPS device will greatly facilitate the endeavor. The color photos and descriptions also aid in identifying the structures. The book is organized to simplify its’ use. The Alabama Hills are broken down into nine areas that are covered separately; each with its’ own map, feature descriptions, and color photos. An index map and map key help in navigating the book. Information on the history of the area, geology, camping, suggested itineraries, and road conditions is also included.   About the Author: Orlyn Fordham was born in Kalispell, Montana in 1954. He has lived in Washington and California and he currently resides in Nevada. He earned a Bachelor’s degree in Earth Science from California State University, Northridge and a teaching credential in Physical Science from California State University, Fullerton. After 27 years of teaching in public schools, Orlyn retired. Besides viewing arches, the author enjoys riding motorcycles, traveling, hunting, fishing, camping, freestyle Frisbee, snowboarding, rafting, mountain biking, surfing, wakeboarding, playing guitar and harmonica, and flying RC planes.
The Man and His Wings$49.95
The Man and His Wings
William Wild Bill Wellman was not Paramount Pictures' first choice to direct the World War I epic WingS≪/i> (1927), but as a former aviator and war hero, he was the right choice. Despite months waging epic battles of his own with studio executives, Wild Bill managed to finish the big-budget war saga by inventing many of the techniques still used to film aerial battle scenes. The film, starring Clara Bow, broke box office records and earned its studio the first Academy Award for Best Picture. Considered by many to be the last great film of the silent era, WingS≪/i> has been cited as a major influence on such directors as Martin Scorsese and Robert Redford. Its director, who went on to direct the likes of John Wayne, James Cagney, and Gary Cooper, later earned an Oscar for writing one of Hollywood's most loved (and often remade) films, A Star is Born. In this biography, the director's son, William Wellman Jr., reveals the war hero, family man, occasional prankster, and underestimated visionary who changed Hollywood forever.   Augmented with personal correspondence from Wellman's own World War I tour of duty as a fighter pilot, on-set photographs from WingS≪/i> and other classic Hollywood films, and anecdotes from the back lots of the early studio system, this unique work traces the way in which the first Best Picture's director used his own war experience to bring a war epic to the screen. The versatile director also excelled at comedies such as Nothing Sacred (1937), and had a lasting influence on the gangster genre with The Public Enemy (1931), starring James Cagney. With the recent release of Wellman's later aviation classics, Island in the Sky (1953) and The High and the Mighty (1954), both starring John Wayne, Wellman is gaining renewed attention and appreciation from a new generation of film enthusiasts. The book ends with a detailed Filmography of more than 75 classic films directed by Wellman.  Pages 208     Early reviews of the book include: "Wild Bill Wellman was one of a kind, and so is this chonicle of his life and adventures leading up to the making of "Wings." I was especially touched by his letters home from France during World War I; now I understand a bit more about the young heroes he depicted on screen." -- Leonard Maltin, Film Critic and Historian "I've been studying and researching Wild Bill Wellman for more than 30 years, so take my word for it -- it will take something pretty spectacular to top Bill Wellman Jr.'s effort as the best film book of the year." -- John Gallagher, The National Board of Review "Wellman's letters from France in World War I are a great discovery and add much to his rip-roaring tale of the early movies." -- Kevin Brownlow, Author of "Mary Pickford, Rediscovered" and "The Parade's Gone By..."   "The story of William Wellman is the story of a great adventurer who became a great director. "The Man and His .Wings" documents both halves of the equation, with an unprecedented intimacy, fueled by Wellman's correspondence from the airfields of France during World War I, and his own oral histories and unpublished manuscripts..."  -- Scott Eyman, Author of "Lion of Hollywood" and "Print The Legend"  
Lone Pine in the Movies: Celebrating the Roy Rogers Centennial$12.95
Lone Pine in the Movies: Celebrating the Roy Rogers Centennial
  (2011) One hundred years ago, Leonard Franklin Slye was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. His family later moved to the small hamlet of Duck Run, where they worked a farm that produced a meager living. Young Len wanted a lot more from life, and he eventually got it—as Roy Rogers, King of the Cowboys, hero to millions of American children and a star of both big-screen and small-screen productions. Roy began his storied career right here in Lone Pine, where his first starring film—Under Western Stars—was made in early 1938. We go into some detail on that motion picture in the article that follows. For better or worse, Roy’s career crisscrossed and intersected that of Gene Autry, the screen’s first singing-cowboy star and the top box-office draw of Republic Pictures, where both men plied their trade for years. In his 1976 book Hollywood Lone_Pine_in_The_Movies_2011_ThumbnailCorral, film historian Don Miller recognized their unique connection and decided to cover Gene and Roy together. His essay, “The Men from Music Mountain,” was of course included in the 1992 Riverwood Press reissue of Hollywood Corral. But both versions of Miller’s invaluable history have been out of print for many years now, and we’re confident that many people reading Don’s essay here will be seeing it for the first time. Chris Langley, a former director of the Lone Pine Film Festival and still on the board of the Museum of Film History, has been contributing to Lone Pine in the Movies since we published the first issue in 2003. From that number—which, like Hollywood Corral, is long out of print—we have reprinted by popular demand his groundbreaking article on silent-era director Clarence Badger. Chris is also represented in these pages with his latest essay, an overview of the career of director Lesley Selander, a frequent visitor to Lone Pine whose Westerns shot here include the vehicles of such major Western stars as Buck Jones and Tim Holt, as well as many entries in the Hopalong Cassidy series starring William Boyd. This year, with his superb article on Brigham Young (1940), we enlist in our Writers Brigade a distinguished new contributor. James V. D’Arc, Ph.D., has been at Brigham Young University’s L. Tom Perry Special Collections since 1976. He is curator of the BYU Motion Picture Archive, the BYU Film Music Archive and the Arts and Communications Archive, and also runs the BYU Motion Picture Archive Film Series. Jim is responsible for acquiring and assisting patrons with access to BYU’s motion picture-related manuscript collections that include Cecil B. DeMille, Merian C. Cooper, Henry Koster, James Stewart, Andy Devine, Max Steiner, Ernest Gold, Hugo Friedhofer, Ken Darby, Jack Mathis, and the Republic Pictures Music Archive. Since 1995, he has produced limited edition original soundtrack albums from the Max Steiner Collection at BYU, with a total of 18 titles in print. He provided the audio commentary for Fox Home Entertainment’s DVD of Brigham Young and can be seen on various documentaries, including American Epic: Cecil B. DeMille, Hello, I’m King Kong!, and The Ten Commandments: Making Miracles. Jim is the author of When Hollywood Came to Town: A History of Moviemaking in Utah (Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith, 2010), a hardcover book with more than 350 illustrations with behind the scenes stories and that also identifies locations for the dozens of great western classic films made in Utah since 1924. This is his second time at the Lone Pine Film Festival. He previously visited us in 2009, when he graciously allowed us to screen one of BYU’s treasures, the classic 1943 Republic serial Daredevils of the West. Once again we’re greatly in his debt, and we guarantee you’ll enjoy his impeccably researched article. Finally, in responses to dozens—perhaps hundreds—of requests we’ve received over the last five years or so, we are including a revised and updated checklist of films made wholly or partially on locations in Lone Pine and the eastern Sierras. (108 Pages)   Click here to Preview this Edition:
Lone Pine in the Movies: Celebrate The Centennials$12.95
Lone Pine in the Movies: Celebrate The Centennials
(2012) The latest edition of this award-winning journal, published annually for attendees of the Lone Pine Film Festival, celebrates the centennials of two legendary Hollywood studios: Universal and Paramount. In keeping with the magazine’s theme, each article focuses on films made in and around Lone Pine, the small California town nestled at the base of Mt. Whitney, just a stone’s throw from the picturesque Alabama Hills. The opening piece, discussing Universal silent-era Westerns produced in the area, is followed by lengthy career studies of Thirties cowboy star Ken Maynard and Fifties cowboy star Audie Murphy. There’s also a behind-the-scenes look at the production of TREMORS, Universal’s 1990 sci-fi smash shot in Lone Pine. This is followed by a detailed analysis of THE ROUNDUP (1920), which not only marked Paramount’s first excursion to Lone Pine but is also the earliest extant film lensed in the Alabama Hills. The studio’s many Zane Grey adaptations are also explored in depth, and the issue closes out with a special portfolio of newly shot photos matched to vintage stills from a 1941 Hopalong Cassidy movie released by Paramount. This year’s "Lone Pine in the Movies," like its predecessors, is profusely illustrated with more than 100 vintage stills, posters and lobby cards. At 112 pages in length, it’s a treasure trove of film history that will appeal to casual fans and hard-core aficionados alike. (112 Pages)
Lone Pine in the Movies: Celebrating Republic's 75th Anniversary$12.95
Lone Pine in the Movies: Celebrating Republic's 75th Anniversary
(2010) Over a period of 25 years Republic Pictures produced some of the most action-packed Westerns, serials and adventure films ever made. A number of the best-including Republic's first release, Westward Ho Lone_Pine_in_the_Movies_2010(1935)-were shot in Lone Pine. This jumbo-sized edition of Lone Pine in the Movies pays homage to the studio's output with a group of fact-filled, profusely illustrated articles written by a Who's Who of distinguished film historians including Richard W. Bann, William K. Everson, Ed Hulse, Chris Langley, Don Miller, and Samuel M. Sherman. (108 Pages)     Click here to preview this edition:
Lone Pine in the Movies: Daredevils of the West$12.95
Lone Pine in the Movies: Daredevils of the West
(2009) This lavishly illustrated book celebrates the first 20 years of the Lone Pine Film Festival, which offers informative tours and exclusively shows vintage films shot in the area. The sleepy California community of Lone Pine and the surrounding Alabama Hills, nestled at the foot of Mount Whitney, has been used as a location by filmmakers in hundreds of movies dating back to the silent era. Inside this publication you will find more than 100 pages of rare photographs and comprehensive studies written by noted film historians who have chronicled the filmmaking activities in Lone Pine. Featured are articles covering the rediscovered classic 1943 Republic serial "Daredevils of the West," a tribute to film festival co-founder Dave Holland, a pictorial retrospective of the first 20 festivals by noted photographer Don Kelsen, and much more. A wonderful keepsake for anyone who has or is planning to visit and enjoy the heritage of this majestic cinema location. (106 Pages)     Click here to preview this edition:
In a Door, Into a Fight, Out a Door, Into a Chase$35.00
In a Door, Into a Fight, Out a Door, Into a Chase
Early in 1937, a young film editor went on-location to St. George, Utah, for the filming of Republic’s The Painted Stallion. Rain and cast problems put the production hopelessly behind schedule. The studio summarily fired the director and replaced him with the film editor. Thus was born the career of one of Hollywood’s most famous serial directors, Bill Witney.William_Witney_Photo   Witney went on to direct or codirect 23 Republic serials, working with such stars as William Benedict, Hoot Gibson, Bela Lugosi, and Noah Beery, Sr. Witney’s output included some of the most famous cliffhangers of the era, such as Adventures of Red Ryder, Spy Smasher, Drums of Fu Manchu, The Lone Ranger, and The Lone Ranger Rides Again. Though he enjoyed a long career as a feature film and television director, it is the Republic serials for which he is best remembered. This engaging story is a behind-the-scenes look at the heyday of the Hollywood cliffhanger, the making of the movies, and the people involved in them.   Please click HERE  to visit our exhibit page and learn more about this legendary Director      Links:  WILLIAM WITNEY OFFICIAL WEBSITE:  http://williamwitney.com/eliteaficionados.html TARANTINOon WITNEY:  http://wiki.tarantino.info/index.php/QT_discusses_William_Witney WIKIPEDIA:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Witney IMDB http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0936823/ COOL & CRAZY: http://coolandthecrazy.blogspot.com/
Hopalong Cassidy On The Page, On The Screen$40.00
Hopalong Cassidy On The Page, On The Screen
Author: Francis M. Nevins 520 pages Clarence E. Mulford spent his creative years writing a vast saga of interlocking novels and stories, most of them dealing with the Bar-20 ranch and the men who called it home, chief among them a certain Hopalong Cassidy. Eventually Mulford's works became the nominal source of 66 Hollywood films, made between 1935 and 1948, and a 52-episode TV series (1952-54), all starring William Boyd as a character with the same name but very different from Mulford's. Hopalong Cassidy: On the Page, On the Screen covers each of Mulford's books and each of the Cassidy theatrical films in full detail. A comprehensive index enables readers interested in almost anyone or anything linked to the books or film--including eventual stars like Robert Mitchum, George Reeves, Jan Clayton, and Barbara Britton--to find the relevant material instantly. Hopalong Cassidy: On the Page, On the Screen covers each of Mulford's books and each of the Cassidy theatrical films in full detail. A comprehensive index enables readers interested in almost anything linked to the books or films - including eventual stars like Robert Mitchum, George Reeves, Jan Clayton and Barbara Britton - to find the relevant material instantly.  To Preview:  Hopalong Cassidy: On the Page, On the Screen - Please click here....
Filming the West of Zane Grey$34.95
Filming the West of Zane Grey
"Filming in the West of Zane Grey” by Ed Hulse is the definitive reference guide to all 113 feature films and serials adapted from Grey’s published yarns and stories, supplied directly to movie producers. No other book has covered Zane Grey motion pictures in this detail, and with many of the early films either lost or unavailable, this book is an invaluable reference source for casual fans and serious researchers alike. Many of the Zane Grey westerns were filmed in the Lone Pine area. Best selling author Zane Grey wrote nearly 60 novels set in the American West, and a substantial number of them were adapted for the silver screen - some of them up to five times. With a total estimated audience of 250 million people, the former dentist and world-class fisherman entranced readers and viewers for decades with his highly romanticized tales of the frontier and the colorful pioneers who settled it. Some 111 feature-length films and two cliffhanger serials were adapted directly from Grey's stories, and Filming the West of Zane Grey covers each one in detail. Casts, credits, plots synopses, contemporaneous reviews, release dates, running times, alternate titles-just about everything you'd want or need to know about Zane Grey movies is here. And film historian Ed Hulse ties it all together with an extensive, analytical, bio-historical essay.  Author: Ed Hulse273 Pages           To Preview:  Filming The West with Zane Grey: - Please click here....  
30 Years on the Road with Gene Autry$29.95
30 Years on the Road with Gene Autry
Johnny Bond was one of the few members of Gene Autry’s musical troupe to participate in every phase of Autry’s entertainment career. A member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame, Bond’s insightful recollections and humorous stories recall a time when radio and movies were the primary source of entertainment for millions of Americans. They are of a time when highways were two-lane, cars and busses were not air conditioned, and the music traveled those roads. The reader is presented with a unique picture from a true insider of one of the 20th Century’s greatest and most beloved entertainers, Gene Autry. 30 Years On The Road With Gene Autry was written by Johnny Bond in 1975 but was not published at the time. Patsy Montana told me in 1979 that Johnny would not publish it because of his friendship with Gene Autry who apparently didn't want anything negative and it mentions the dates he missed due to drinking. Overall Autry was fair with those who worked with him. There's also recollections by Bond of his own career. The book is published by Johnny Bond's daughter Sherry as it should be now that Autry and Bond have both passed on.Author: Johnny BondPages: 273 To Preview:  30 Years on the Raod with Gene Autry - Please click here....
Vaqueros, Cowboys, and Buckaroos:$19.95
Vaqueros, Cowboys, and Buckaroos:
Vaqueros, Cowboys, and Buckaroos: The Genesis and Life of the Mounted North American Herders: Herding cattle from horseback has been a tradition in northern Mexico and the American West since the Spanish colonial era. The first mounted herders were the Mexican vaqueros, expert horsemen who developed the skills to work cattle in the brush country and deserts of the Southwestern borderlands. From them, Texas cowboys learned the trade, evolving their own unique culture that spread across the Southwest and Great Plains. The buckaroos of the Great Basin west of the Rockies trace their origin to the vaqueros, with influence along the way from the cowboys, though they, too, have ways and customs distinctly their own.   In this book, three long-time students of the American West describe the history, working practices, and folk culture of vaqueros, cowboys, and buckaroos. They draw on historical records, contemporary interviews, and numerous photographs to show 
Blood 'n' Thunder's Western Movie Roundup: Summer 2012$12.95
Blood 'n' Thunder's Western Movie Roundup: Summer 2012
A sister publication to BLOOD 'N' THUNDER, this spin-off covers motion-picture Westerns from the dawn of the silent-film era up to the present day, with a special concentration on "B" Westerns of the Thirties and Forties. The first issue, being a trial balloon, reprints material previously published in BLOOD 'N' THUNDER. Leading off is a comparison of two Tom Mix silents, THE UNTAMED and JUST TONY, to the Max Brand pulp novels from which they were adapted. A behind-the-scenes look at the production of THE LONE RANGER, a 1938 Republic serial, features extensive quotes from co-director William Witney. Our lengthy piece on the first Hopalong Cassidy film offers a detailed chronology of the events that produced the inaugural entry in this long-running series. Likewise, a similar article explains at great length how Republic Pictures took Ohio farm boy Leonard Slye and transformed him into Roy Rogers, King of the Cowboys. The bulk of the issue is devoted to a comprehensive history of legendary Western author Zane Grey's involvement with Hollywood -- a relationship that spawned over a hundred motion pictures. These articles have been extensively researched, and they present much heretofore unreported information. BLOOD 'N' THUNDER'S WESTERN MOVIE ROUNDUP is illustrated with well over 100 reproductions of vintage photos, posters and lobby cards. Many of the stills are candid, never-before-published shots taken during production of the films discussed.   About the Author:       Ed Hulse has been a journalist and film historian for over 30 years. His essays, reviews and news stories about the home-video and motion-picture industries have appeared in such mainstream publications as PREMIERE, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY, THE NEW YORKER, and the NEW YORK TIMES, as well as the trade journals VARIETY, MILLIMETER, VIDEO BUSINESS, and THIS WEEK IN CONSUMER ELECTRONICS. During the late 1980s his work was syndicated by the Washington Post Writers Group. For four years he edited a monthly magazine, VIDEO REVIEW'S PREVIEWS. He co-edited (with Packy Smith) the revised and expanded 1994 version of DON MILLER'S HOLLYWOOD CORRAL and was contributing editor to LEONARD MALTIN'S MOVIE ENCYCLOPEDIA. Between 2000 and 2007 he was the lead critic and celebrity interviewer for the Film/Video section of Barnes&Noble.com. Hulse is the author of THE FILMS OF BETTY GRABLE, FILMING THE WEST OF ZANE GREY, THE BLOOD 'N' THUNDER GUIDE TO COLLECTING PULPS, and DISTRESSED DAMSELS AND MASKED MARAUDERS. For nearly four years he hosted MOVIE MANIA, the nation's first public-access cable TV show devoted exclusively to movies. For many years he has participated in the Lone Pine Film Festival and edited its annual journal, LONE PINE IN THE MOVIES.
A High Sierra Christmas$12.95
A High Sierra Christmas
  *HOLIDAY EDITION: 'A High Sierra Christmas' is a tale of the West, narrated in the 'old west' style. It's a story of Jeremiah Johnson and his 'later in life' adventures in the High Sierra-Nevada mountain range of California. Two old cowboys, looking for gold, seek out Johnson and ask him to guide them to their dreams across the rugged High Sierra. In this fireside tale, Jeremiah and his Indian friend, John Windwalker, embark on that adventure with his visiting young nieces, Carrie and Hannah, and his nephew, Marc. The group rides out on a difficult journey up the east side of the majestic, white granite range, headed toward Mineral King on its western slopes. But, when the bank in Big Pine is robbed, three lawless men in their getaway head up the trail right behind them. What happens next is a long way from what you might expect. For young and old alike, it's for sure a Christmas to remember. You'd best saddle up and ride along!  175 Pages .......................................................     About the Author Mark_Taylor About the Author: Mark Stephen Taylor is the award-winning author of a most enlightening journey; 'Hiking the Trail of Truth', Knowing God Through His Creation, published in February of 2009. Following that most inspiring autobiography he went on to write; 'Hiking Life’s Difficult Trails'; a spiritual journey into the struggles that we all face as we walk through our daily lives. His fictional works that followed are; 'A High Sierra Christmas'; an untold tale of Jeremiah Johnson, 'The Sun, The Glass, and The Leaning Rock'; The Secret of the Lost Dutchman’s Gold, and 'The Secret of Monument Valley'; The Trail of the Anasazi. The last two writings mentioned above are the first two installments in his most interesting mystery series, involving treasure hunter Rod Florea and cartographer (map maker) Mitch Holland. These tales offer both cliff-hanging fiction and profound reality, and are actually based on enduring legends and controversies that we’re all familiar with. There are two more books scheduled for this series, 'The Treasure of the High Sierra', and 'The Secret of Death Valley', both due out in 2012. In this newest release, 'Three Days in Lone Pine; An Untold Tale of the High Sierra', Mr. Taylor delves into the history surrounding the very first climbs of Mt. Whitney, highest mountain in the contiguous United States. This is no ordinary tale, and deals with both the cultures of the times and some illuminating, supernatural events that unfold on the town, which allow us to embrace a deeper understanding of the difficulties that all of us face in the world in which we live today. This story is based on the age-old struggle between the forces of good and evil, and opens our eyes to the actual reality behind it all.     Biography Mark Stephen Taylor is what you might call an author on the road (be sure to check out his VIDEO on this author's page). Since his retirement from law enforcement in 1994, he has hiked much of the High Sierra mountain range of California and explored the vast deserts of the American Southwest. He has also spent time among the Native Americans. His experiences and knowledge have earned him a writing style that is indeed unique. His books include both fiction and non-fiction works--there's something of interest for everyone. His book tours also allow him to meet with many people on a personal level and share with them his obvious wisdom and insight. Mr. Taylor was educated in criminal psychology and geology, and is currently a Biblical teacher and counselor. His award-winning autobiography, 'Hiking the Trail of Truth', is perhaps one of the most informative books ever written on the subject of 'knowing God through His creation'. Each of his varied works, both fiction and non-fiction, have generated outstanding reviews. He's always out there; hiking around somewhere in the west and working on something new. His latest historical fiction works are: 'The Secret of Monument Valley; the Trail of the Anazazi', which is based on actual accounts from Native Americans of the Navajo Nation, and, 'Three Days in Lone Pine: an Untold Tale of the High Sierra', which is based on both history and legend surrounding the ill-fated first climbs (1873) of California's Mt. Whitney; highest mountain in the contiguous USA. His most recent work (Aug 2012), 'Treasure of the High Sierra: Dead Men's Gold', is a must read for those who love pirate tales and ghost stories. Our latest report on Mr. Taylor is that he is living in or near Lone Pine CA, and currently writing, 'Something Has Come Between Us', a spiritual journey, and also working on the newest addition to his mystery series, 'The Secret of Death Valley'. Taylor does occasional weekend book signings (weather permitting) in the town at the 'Lone Pine Rock and Gift Shop', and also at the 'Lone Star Bistro'. Information on contacting Mr. Taylor personally can be found within any of his books. He claims to be nobody special, and loves to hear from his readers.
LONE PINE: A Story of Love Undying$12.95
LONE PINE: A Story of Love Undying
LONE PINE: A Story of Love Undying... There are those who truly know what love is all about, and there are those who do not. This is a tragic yet incredibly heartwarming story about those who do. Narrated by Stands With The Bear of the Shoshone Nation, you are about to embark on a journey into the lives of four very intimate friends, who make their abode in Lone Pine, California; home of Mt. Whitney, highest mountain in the contiguous United States, located in the bold, majestic range of the High and mighty Sierra-Nevada. This story takes you from the very beginning of their rewarding journey together, to probing into the incredible depth of their individual lives, and highlighting their most profound adventures into reality as a group. It is a story of how they eventually become one in spirit, and soar as individuals into a unique realm of understanding and bond of love that few humans ever experience, yet would surely grab onto the opportunity to do so. Accordingly, this knowledgeable perception of love is truly obtainable. From award-winning author and explorer, Mark Stephen Taylor, this story of ordinary, careworn human beings, graciously transformed by the wonders of their environment, explores the diverse tragedies and rewards that come with self-discovery in the world in which we are all a part of. Taylor’s writing style and insight are once again evident in this astonishingly down to earth tale of faith, hope and love undying. Come and hike along with his undisguised characters and see for yourself.  236 Pages .......................................................     About the Author Mark_Taylor About the Author: Mark Stephen Taylor is the award-winning author of a most enlightening journey; 'Hiking the Trail of Truth', Knowing God Through His Creation, published in February of 2009. Following that most inspiring autobiography he went on to write; 'Hiking Life’s Difficult Trails'; a spiritual journey into the struggles that we all face as we walk through our daily lives. His fictional works that followed are; 'A High Sierra Christmas'; an untold tale of Jeremiah Johnson, 'The Sun, The Glass, and The Leaning Rock'; The Secret of the Lost Dutchman’s Gold, and 'The Secret of Monument Valley'; The Trail of the Anasazi. The last two writings mentioned above are the first two installments in his most interesting mystery series, involving treasure hunter Rod Florea and cartographer (map maker) Mitch Holland. These tales offer both cliff-hanging fiction and profound reality, and are actually based on enduring legends and controversies that we’re all familiar with. There are two more books scheduled for this series, 'The Treasure of the High Sierra', and 'The Secret of Death Valley', both due out in 2012. In this newest release, 'Three Days in Lone Pine; An Untold Tale of the High Sierra', Mr. Taylor delves into the history surrounding the very first climbs of Mt. Whitney, highest mountain in the contiguous United States. This is no ordinary tale, and deals with both the cultures of the times and some illuminating, supernatural events that unfold on the town, which allow us to embrace a deeper understanding of the difficulties that all of us face in the world in which we live today. This story is based on the age-old struggle between the forces of good and evil, and opens our eyes to the actual reality behind it all.     Biography Mark Stephen Taylor is what you might call an author on the road (be sure to check out his VIDEO on this author's page). Since his retirement from law enforcement in 1994, he has hiked much of the High Sierra mountain range of California and explored the vast deserts of the American Southwest. He has also spent time among the Native Americans. His experiences and knowledge have earned him a writing style that is indeed unique. His books include both fiction and non-fiction works--there's something of interest for everyone. His book tours also allow him to meet with many people on a personal level and share with them his obvious wisdom and insight. Mr. Taylor was educated in criminal psychology and geology, and is currently a Biblical teacher and counselor. His award-winning autobiography, 'Hiking the Trail of Truth', is perhaps one of the most informative books ever written on the subject of 'knowing God through His creation'. Each of his varied works, both fiction and non-fiction, have generated outstanding reviews. He's always out there; hiking around somewhere in the west and working on something new. His latest historical fiction works are: 'The Secret of Monument Valley; the Trail of the Anazazi', which is based on actual accounts from Native Americans of the Navajo Nation, and, 'Three Days in Lone Pine: an Untold Tale of the High Sierra', which is based on both history and legend surrounding the ill-fated first climbs (1873) of California's Mt. Whitney; highest mountain in the contiguous USA. His most recent work (Aug 2012), 'Treasure of the High Sierra: Dead Men's Gold', is a must read for those who love pirate tales and ghost stories. Our latest report on Mr. Taylor is that he is living in or near Lone Pine CA, and currently writing, 'Something Has Come Between Us', a spiritual journey, and also working on the newest addition to his mystery series, 'The Secret of Death Valley'. Taylor does occasional weekend book signings (weather permitting) in the town at the 'Lone Pine Rock and Gift Shop', and also at the 'Lone Star Bistro'. Information on contacting Mr. Taylor personally can be found within any of his books. He claims to be nobody special, and loves to hear from his readers.
Three Days in LONE PINE: An Untold Tale of the High Sierra, 1873$13.95
Three Days in LONE PINE: An Untold Tale of the High Sierra, 1873
Do you believe in angels? In 1873 the town of Lone Pine, California came to believe in them. Lone Pine is the home of Mt. Whitney, highest mountain in the contiguous United States, towering some 14, 497 feet. The white granite range of the High Sierra has been around for several thousand years, its towering spires unique in North America. However, the first recorded climb to this peak was not until August 18th, 1873, when three local fishermen braved the lofty crags and reached its elusive summit. Prior to that, there had been many attempts, but recorded history tells us those climbers who made the attempts never ended up on the right peak! Some of them did not return, and were never heard from again. Hundreds of peaks point skyward in this range of mountains, and though Mt. Whitney is the highest, it remained the most elusive for decades. But Indian legends tell of evil spirits that once made their abode atop this very mountain. From this great height it was believed that these dark forces planned their wicked strategies against our entire country. It was their mountain! The Indian legends also foretold of a time when the evil would be no more; a time when men and women would freely hike the mountain and experience the wonder and exhilaration it could produce within one’s spirit. According to those legends, and according to an old diary found in the hills just west of Lone Pine, that time did arrive. It was in August of 1873, when the most powerful leader of the angelic host paid an unannounced visit to the town. After his Three Days in Lone Pine, the mountain, the birds and the animals…even the people, would never be the same. 206 Pages .......................................................     About the Author Mark_Taylor About the Author: Mark Stephen Taylor is the award-winning author of a most enlightening journey; 'Hiking the Trail of Truth', Knowing God Through His Creation, published in February of 2009. Following that most inspiring autobiography he went on to write; 'Hiking Life’s Difficult Trails'; a spiritual journey into the struggles that we all face as we walk through our daily lives. His fictional works that followed are; 'A High Sierra Christmas'; an untold tale of Jeremiah Johnson, 'The Sun, The Glass, and The Leaning Rock'; The Secret of the Lost Dutchman’s Gold, and 'The Secret of Monument Valley'; The Trail of the Anasazi. The last two writings mentioned above are the first two installments in his most interesting mystery series, involving treasure hunter Rod Florea and cartographer (map maker) Mitch Holland. These tales offer both cliff-hanging fiction and profound reality, and are actually based on enduring legends and controversies that we’re all familiar with. There are two more books scheduled for this series, 'The Treasure of the High Sierra', and 'The Secret of Death Valley', both due out in 2012. In this newest release, 'Three Days in Lone Pine; An Untold Tale of the High Sierra', Mr. Taylor delves into the history surrounding the very first climbs of Mt. Whitney, highest mountain in the contiguous United States. This is no ordinary tale, and deals with both the cultures of the times and some illuminating, supernatural events that unfold on the town, which allow us to embrace a deeper understanding of the difficulties that all of us face in the world in which we live today. This story is based on the age-old struggle between the forces of good and evil, and opens our eyes to the actual reality behind it all.     Biography Mark Stephen Taylor is what you might call an author on the road (be sure to check out his VIDEO on this author's page). Since his retirement from law enforcement in 1994, he has hiked much of the High Sierra mountain range of California and explored the vast deserts of the American Southwest. He has also spent time among the Native Americans. His experiences and knowledge have earned him a writing style that is indeed unique. His books include both fiction and non-fiction works--there's something of interest for everyone. His book tours also allow him to meet with many people on a personal level and share with them his obvious wisdom and insight. Mr. Taylor was educated in criminal psychology and geology, and is currently a Biblical teacher and counselor. His award-winning autobiography, 'Hiking the Trail of Truth', is perhaps one of the most informative books ever written on the subject of 'knowing God through His creation'. Each of his varied works, both fiction and non-fiction, have generated outstanding reviews. He's always out there; hiking around somewhere in the west and working on something new. His latest historical fiction works are: 'The Secret of Monument Valley; the Trail of the Anazazi', which is based on actual accounts from Native Americans of the Navajo Nation, and, 'Three Days in Lone Pine: an Untold Tale of the High Sierra', which is based on both history and legend surrounding the ill-fated first climbs (1873) of California's Mt. Whitney; highest mountain in the contiguous USA. His most recent work (Aug 2012), 'Treasure of the High Sierra: Dead Men's Gold', is a must read for those who love pirate tales and ghost stories. Our latest report on Mr. Taylor is that he is living in or near Lone Pine CA, and currently writing, 'Something Has Come Between Us', a spiritual journey, and also working on the newest addition to his mystery series, 'The Secret of Death Valley'. Taylor does occasional weekend book signings (weather permitting) in the town at the 'Lone Pine Rock and Gift Shop', and also at the 'Lone Star Bistro'. Information on contacting Mr. Taylor personally can be found within any of his books. He claims to be nobody special, and loves to hear from his readers.
Hollywood Hoofbeats: Trails Blazed Across The Silver Screen$39.95
Hollywood Hoofbeats: Trails Blazed Across The Silver Screen
From 1903's The Great Train Robbery to 2003's Seabiscuit, horses have played a significant role in the annals of moviemaking. Mitchum (daughter of actor Robert Mitchum) and writer Pavia celebrate equine participation by spotlighting these underappreciated animal stars and their handlers. Identifying horses in films ranging from Westerns to romantic comedies, she tells their stories in encyclopedic detail. Though Roy Rogers's Trigger enjoyed star treatment, many others endured inhumane treatment. Errol Flynn was appalled at the cruelty shown toward horses in his 1936 film The Charge of the Light Brigade. Despite his protests, directors and stunt coordinators used painful and even lethal methods to obtain effects. While the American Humane Association exerted some influence in the 1940s, their power waned in the '60s. It took 20 years for animal safety to return as a public issue. Indeed, Mitchum contends it's up to audiences to let producers know their films won't be respected if they don't "treat their hardworking equine and other animal cast members with the respect they so richly deserve." Animal lovers in particular will enjoy the tricks of the trade Mitchum discusses, such as the proper way to teach a horse to fall on cue. The authors give insight into an oft-ignored aspect of filmmaking.  BowTie Press 216 Pages   Review:   Reading the review/description on Amazon I rapidly came to the conclusion that words can never do this book justice; it's just too incredible. This is a beautiful and very informative coffee table book with exceptional photographs and movie poster art. Although it does not include information on every horse movie it does an amazing job on most films from the start of motion pictures to things like "Spirit," "Lord of the Rings," and "Hildalgo." Ms. Mitchum spent a ton of time interviewing the top stunt riders and horse trainers in Hollywood and it shows - every page is filled with insightful stories about filming, training, and actors. Well worth the cover price, you won't want to put it down!
The Legendary Lydecker Brothers$24.95
The Legendary Lydecker Brothers
Theodore and Howard Lydecker worked in the Hollywood film industry long before the advent of computer generated imagery (CGI). In those days, exciting and realistic action scenes had to be filmed in real time. Known throughout the industry as the "Miniature Men," they were in fact giants in their field of creating detailed scale model ships, trains, planes, and automobiles. While these carefully crafted models performed on large-scale landscapes or backlot water tanks, all manner of mayhem and chaos would be inflicted upon them as the cameras rolled at carefully calculated film speeds. The Lydeckers produced some of the most thrilling and authentic action sequences on a shoestring budget. Primarily remembered for their outstanding visual effects in the Republic Pictures cliffhanger serials, they were often required (it was their job) to enhance the studio's feature films. When the script called for spectacular destruction, the Lydeckers delivered onscreen production value with economy the executives of the other picture studios could only imagine. This book presents an overview and some illustrated remembrances of the "Legendary Lydecker Brothers" and their outstanding contribution to special visual effects. (196 Pages)   About the Author Jan's published book works include "Speeding Bullet, The Life And Bizarre Death of George Reeves," co-author of "Behind The Crimson Cape, The Cinema of George Reeves" with Steve Randisi. Jan made significant contributions in "Harvey Kubernik's, Canyon of Dreams, The Magic And The Music of Laurel Canyon" published in 2009. Jan has decades of periodical contributions and articles that include published works in such magazines as American Cinematographer, FilmFax, Cult Movies and Television Chronicles, Little Shop of Horrors. He was also sought after by the BBC for an interview in 2008 concerning the history of Laurel Canyon and music scene in Southern California and again by BBC 2 in May of 2010 which was broadcast in August of 2010. Jan was seen as a recurring guest on "Sinister Cinema" from 1986-88. From the 80s to mid 90s he was a consultant to the Universal Laser Disc Division. He was credited on the sci-fi thriller "Creature" (1985), Trans World Productions for Special Effects & Creature Wrangler. 1999 to 2000 saw Henderson appearing on "Mysteries & Scandals" and "A&E Biography" George Reeves episodes. He worked at Don Post Studios, 1977-78, as a maskmaker for Star Wars, Disney Characters, and General Masks. In cooperation with Warner Brothers, he assisted and was interviewed on season's 2-6 of the Warner releases, The "Adventures of Superman" DVDs with George Reeves 2005. That would be followed up by another appearance on the release of the "Superman" serials of 1948/50 that starred Kirk Alyn and Noel Neill 2006. Jan is credited with Kit Parker Films, Capricorn Entertainment and VCI Entertainment for his special features contribution in the restored versions of "Thunder In The Pines" and "Jungle Goddess" with George Reeves and Ralph Byrd 2006. In that same year he was also included as a consultant with Pomethius Productions on "Look Up In The Sky," and appeared on "America's Most Wanted" to discuss the mysterious death of George Reeves, television's first Superman, in conjunction with the release of "Hollywoodland".
Made of Iron$15.00
Made of Iron
Owen Badgett’s Cowboy Poetry and stories are intriguing, honest, opinionated and humerous; words that describe the man and his work. Owen has appeared in Elko, NV, Salinas, Lone Pine and Ridgecrest, CA, and Lewistown and Jordan, MT bringing cowboy poetry to audiences around the country. For over ten years readers have been captivated, moved and sometimes even jolted by Badgett’s stories. He has been called “the real deal,” one of the last of a breed of tough cowmen, and he writes these stories “’cause they need tellin’.” Open a page into Owen’s world, and you won’t be able to put the book down.   Made of Iron  (1998)   110 Pages
Breezes of Eastern Montana$15.00
Breezes of Eastern Montana
Owen Badgett’s Cowboy Poetry and stories are intriguing, honest, opinionated and humerous; words that describe the man and his work. Owen has appeared in Elko, NV, Salinas, Lone Pine and Ridgecrest, CA, and Lewistown and Jordan, MT bringing cowboy poetry to audiences around the country. For over ten years readers have been captivated, moved and sometimes even jolted by Badgett’s stories. He has been called “the real deal,” one of the last of a breed of tough cowmen, and he writes these stories “’cause they need tellin’.” Open a page into Owen’s world, and you won’t be able to put the book down.     Breezes of Eastern Montana  (1986)  54 Pages
Rawhide And Velvet$15.00
Rawhide And Velvet
Badgett’s Cowboy Poetry and stories are intriguing, honest, opinionated and humerous; words that describe the man and his work. Owen has appeared in Elko, NV, Salinas, Lone Pine and Ridgecrest, CA, and Lewistown and Jordan, MT bringing cowboy poetry to audiences around the country. For over ten years readers have been captivated, moved and sometimes even jolted by Badgett’s stories. He has been called “the real deal,” one of the last of a breed of tough cowmen, and he writes these stories “’cause they need tellin’.” Open a page into Owen’s world, and you won’t be able to put the book down.   Rawhide and Velvet  (2003)   121 Pages
The Cowboy's Trail Guide to Western "The 2nd Century Edition"$29.95
The Cowboy's Trail Guide to Western "The 2nd Century Edition"
The Cowboy's Trail Guide to Westerns, The 2nd Century Edition with a foreword by Richard Farnsworth is the  new and revised Edition" of The Cowboy's Trail Guide to Westerns. Over 1000 photographs and illustrations. Hundreds of new film reviews, photgraphs, and memorable quotes! By popular demand, the revised edition includes filming locations and story sources. Academy Awards and nominations are now included. Compare your favorite films with the "100 Best of the West" of the first century and compare your picks for best actors, actresses, character actors, Native American actors, and directors . "The Next 100 Years" section predicts the future of the genre and discusses the making of the first perfect Western.    Celebrate 100 years of Western filmmaking with the 2nd Century Edition of the Cowboy's Trail Guide to Westerns. The most complete collection ever assembled of feature-length Westerns of the sound era. For the first time, a Western movie guide for Westerners written by a Westerner.    Journey back to the Old West with this viewer's guide to movie Westerns. The Cowboy's Trail Guide to Westerns is the first complete guide to the genre written by a Westerner for Westerners. The most complete collection of feature-length movie Westerns ever assembled. Over 2100 films including domestic, foreign films, made-for-television movies and mini-series. Complete with cross-referencing of multiple titles and film industry pseudonyms. More than 900 films rated from a Westerner's perspective.    Discover the real West by a thorough examination of Hollywood's development of the Western myth. Explore the connections between the Western myth and American culture. Compare America's frontier legends with their celluloid counterparts.    The Great Train Robbery (1903) was the first motion picture of any kind to tell a story. The story of the Western is the story of Hollywood. Celebrate the centennial of the Western, discover why it has developed into America's only true art form.    The Cowboy's Trail Guide to Westerns is ideal for working and armchair cowboys alike. It is an essential reference guide for all genre enthusiasts.    609 pages with more than 1000 photographs and illustrations!!!
On Location in Lone Pine A Pictorial Guide to One of Hollywood's$20.00
On Location in Lone Pine A Pictorial Guide to One of Hollywood's
On Location in Lone PineOn_Location_Book_Revision__h_100_x   This book by Dave Holland (co-founder of the Lone Pine Film Festival) takes you to California’s rugged ‘Alabama Hill’s’ where so many westerns with Hoppy, Roy, Gene and John Wayne were made.  Includes maps of the movie locations, so you can hike the same trails once ridden by your favorite Lone Pine Western Heroes.   Revision 2005 ( 106Pages)   Preface   It was almost thirty years ago that I first walked theses Alabama Hills. For as long as I can remember, poking around Californian and the West (looking for the various spots where they mad the old movies) has been a favorite pastime, one that has brought about many a glorious morning and many a hot afternoon hiking thorough the rocks an brush at the old movie ranches (Iverson's and Corriganville) and at Hollywood's more "distant" film locations, Red Rock Canyon, Vasquez Rocks, Beale's Cut, Lake Sherwood , Old Tucson, Monument Valley, Oak Creek Canyon, the Alamo Village at Brackettville, Texas, so many more - even Bronson Canyon, which is right in Hollywood! - Looking for (and finding) where the Indian chase in Stagecoach began, where John Wayne held and killed off the Indians in Apache Rifles, where the Lone Ranger Rock was and the Nyoka Cliff and Ford Point.   Then one day, I noticed something interesting…no, make that fascinating, for it has certainly proved to be that. Looking at a Gene Autry photo from Boots and Saddles, I noticed that he and his sidekick, Frog" (Smiley Burnette) were sitting their horses by a tall, thick cucumber shaped rock which was - it was so obvious, it was startling - at the very same spot where the Indian chase in How The West Was Won began and where Tim Holt had tired ditching a posse in one of his RKO pictures called Guns Of Hate! And these were films as many as 25 years apart (in 1937, 1962, and 1948, respectively! (I was on the verge of "discovering" a new gold mine of movie locations to go explore.   They were shot, I learned, near a town some 3 -4 hours north of Los Angeles - I would later be astonished to learn how many films had been done on location in Lone Pine - more specifically, in that unusual grouping of rocks and canyons called the Alabama Hills, one of Hollywood's favorite locations now for 70 years,   We headed north immediately.   Needless to say, when we first drove out into these Alabama Hills, it was love (and immediate recognition) at first sight. I knew I had been here there, countless times - first in the private darknesses of so many movie theatres, and then camped in front of the TV set.   "This is the Khyber Pass," I announced. "I don't care what that sign says, this is the Khyber Pass!"   Hurrying back into the town of Lone Pine, I asked where I could buy a book on all the movies done out in the Alabama Hills, the Hop along Cassidy Movies, the British Army in India Movies, the ones with Roy Gene and John Wayne. "There isn't one," I was told. Well, there is now - and thanks for letting me be the one to enjoy the thrill of the hunt, a poring through photos at film conventions and paper conventions and in studio archives, at Eddie Brandt's Saturday Matinee store, at Collectors Bookstores, at Larry Edmunds Books, among others. Thanks for letting me be the one to interview and get to know the townspeople and the movie-makers who worked there. Now we can all stand where John Wayne stood. And the Lone Ranger and Tom Mix and Randolph Scott.   I hope it was worth the wait.   Dave Holland Granada Hills, Californi
The Lone Pine Film Festival; The First Twenty Years$21.95
The Lone Pine Film Festival; The First Twenty Years
The Lone Pine Film Festival; The First Twenty Years 1990 - 2009 by Vern Estes   For anyone who is interested in the history of the Lone Pine Film Festival, this is the book to own. The publication explains the origin of the Festival and the year-to-year activities. The following can be found in the book:   Over 100 photos and mini-Bios of visiting celebrities; actors, writers, directors, producers and stunt performers. A list of “Showcase Movies” Parade Grand Marshalls List of Friday night entertainers and other performers Special events; mounted shooters, gun fights, rodeos and other events Detail list of available bus movie site tours Photos and mini-bios of frequent visiting costumed look-a-likes The book will serve as a great reference when trying to answer the question “what year was that actor at the Festival”? (195 Pages)    The Author, Vernon Estes, was born in Kentucky, is a retired US Army Helicopter Pilot liveing in Tacoma, Washington. Vern has been a long time visitor to Lone Pine and supporter of the Film Festival.  
Great Ranches of Today's Wild West$21.99
Great Ranches of Today's Wild West
A Breathtaking Adventure through the Stirring Landscape of the Modern Wild West.   IGreat_Ranches_of_Todays_Wild_West_320_xn this beautiful collection, veteran travel writer Mark Bedor takes readers on a journey through twenty of the great ranches of today’s Wild West. With over 200 stunning full-color photographs, reading Great Ranches of Today’s Wild West is almost as good as being there. Take a horseback ride through the snowy woods at Vista Verde Ranch in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, or follow in the footsteps of Butch Cassidy on the Outlaw Trail at Utah’s Tavaputs Ranch—it’s all just another part of the American ranch experience. (212 Pages with color illustrations)   About the Authors Mark Bedor has been writing about the American West for more than ten years. His articles and photographs have appeared in more than two dozen magazines. He lives in Los Angeles, California. William C. Reynolds is currently the editor of the Cowboy Way magazine and publisher of Ranch & Reata. He lives in Santa Ynez, California.
Cowboy Church$12.50
Cowboy Church
“Cowboy Church” by Rev. Ben Sparks. This is a collection of sermons by Rev. Sparks given during Sunday’s Cowboy Church, an event at the annual Film Festival. Cowboy Church is held outside at theAnchor Ranch with the awe-inspiring Sierra Nevada Mountains as a backdrop. Each sermon relates to the theme of the Film Festival. This paperback collection retails for $12.50. The author, Ben W. Sparks, is a graduate of California Baptist University and Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary. In 2005 he retired as pastor of Mt. Whitney Baptist Church where he served for 28 years. He is quick to say, he has not retired from serving God. Its lightweight paperback format is perfect for carrying with you at all times or tucking into the car or a place where you frequently sit and read for a few moments, or a long time, for spiritual renewal or inspiration. 62 Pages     This book is available for your church or place of business for 40% discount,plus shipping, and tax, if applicable.  Please call the Museum for purchasing arrangements.  760-876-9909.  
The All-American Cowboy Grill: Sizzlin' Recipes from the World's $25.00
The All-American Cowboy Grill: Sizzlin' Recipes from the World's
Enjoy mouthwatering recipes rustled up by some of the world's most famous movie, TV, rodeo, and music cowboys and cowgirls, as well as by cooks at some of the top real-life ranches in the United states.   Ronald Reagan's Rancho del Cielo Tri-Tip Paul Newman's Saddle-up Steak with Mucho Garlic Forrest Tucker's Peanut Butter Steak Rodeo champion Ty Murray's Swiss Grilled Chicken James Garner's Maverick's Chili Jam Chicken Smiley Burnette's Grilled Pork Chops Gene Autry's Veal Chops California John Wayne's Red River Barbecue Sauce These are just a few of the more than 250 recipes that will please any cowpoke. The focus is on sizzlin' meals from the grill, but you'll also find a wagonload of appetizers, side-dishes, breads, and desserts, along with main dishes for the indoor cookstove.   Loaded with more than 200 classic photographs and saddlebags full of Old West memories and fun trivia treasures, The All-American Cowboy Grill is sure to delight every fan. (240 Pages
Cowboy Princess: Life with My Parents Roy Rogers and Dale Evans$25.00
Cowboy Princess: Life with My Parents Roy Rogers and Dale Evans
Cowboy Princess: Life with my parents, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans tells the story of Cheryl's beloved parents froma a point of view that is uniquely hers. It's filled with hilarious and touching stories of their relationship with each other and with their children and includes countless behind-the-scenes stories of Roy and Dale's movies, television appearances, and music. Leavening the warm and illuminating stories and memories are dozens of rare photographs-family snapshots, studio portraits, behind-the-scenes stills--most of which have never been published in a book and many of which have never been published anywhere.   For fans of the King of the Cowboys and the Queen of the West--and for anyone interested in the great performers of yesteryear--this book provides an up close and personal introduction to Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, their family, and the many colorful characters who rode beside them on those happy happy trails. (224 Pages)
Gene Autry Westerns$45.00
Gene Autry Westerns
This publication is like no other book on Gene Autry! Each film contains: release date, major production credits, complete cast (including character played), all songs included, who wrote them & who performs them in the film, running time, filming dates, cast bios of major players (Smiley, Pat Buttram, Cass County Boys, Herb Yates, heavies, directors, song writers, leading ladies, etc.), locations used, budget and negative cost, stunt people involved, film analysis/synopsis, notes and comments (including film and cast background info, salaries paid, working titles, etc.), film comments from Gene and many other cast members, theater exhibitor comments at the time of release. All of Gene s Mascot, Republic and Columbia westerns included as well as his half-hour TV episodes. Bonus Material features: where to find individual songs in Gene s films, recurrent themes in Gene s westerns, Gene in print, Gene s appearances in film short subjects and various TV shows, songs written by Gene used in other movies, Gene s Top 10s as selected by 13 noted Autry enthusiasts, handy reference tables listing, by film and TV titles, all of Gene s sidekicks, leading ladies, musical groups, screenwriters, directors, locations, Champion chronology, foreword/afterword by Dick Jones and Jimmy Hawkins, 300+ photographs, many rare! Completely authorized and researched over a two year period utilizing files at Gene Autry Entertainment which revealed information never before published.       About the Author Boyd Magers grew up at the right time and in the right place for a full appreciation of all westerns...the late 40s early 60s. Born in Kansas City, Kansas, in 1940, he grew up with a western influence in Independence, Kansas (near where the Dalton and James Gangs rode) and Ponca City, Oklahoma (the site of the famed 101 Ranch). Beginning in late 1946 he attended the Beldorf in Independence and the Center in Ponca City, riding the range with the current crop of B-western heroes Gene Autry, Monte Hale, Tim Holt, Eddie Dean, Jimmy Wakely, Roy Rogers, Charles Starrett, Johnny Mack Brown and others. By 1953 the new medium of television offered him a steady hour upon hour appreciation of the early screen cowboys Buck Jones, Bob Steele, Hoot Gibson, Ken Maynard, George O Brien, Rex Bell, Tim McCoy and the rest. The early 50s was also the time for the dawning of the TV western Gene Autry , Range Rider , Annie Oakley , Hopalong Cassidy , Kit Carson , Cisco Kid and the others which slowly matured into the so-called adult TV western of the late 50s early 60s, Gunsmoke , Cheyenne , Sugarfoot , Restless Gun and dozens more. Therefore, he came to appreciate all eras of westerns. Following Armed Forces Radio Network military service in Korea from 60- 61, and during a fifteen year career in radio on the air and as program director ( 62- 77), Boyd began to contribute articles on westerns to publications such as COUNTRY STYLE and others. In 1977 he established VideoWest which soon became the most respected source for western movies and TV episodes on video for over 25 years. From 1987 to 1994 he contributed a regular column on westerns to THE BIG REEL. Over the ensuing years he wrote regular columns or contributed articles to COUNTRY AND WESTERN VARIETY, UNDER WESTERN SKIES, CLASSIC IMAGES, FILM COLLECTOR S REGISTRY, among several others. Over the years he s also provided research data and material to over 40 books and several TV/video documentaries. He wrote hundreds of B-western film reviews still being used annually in VIDEO MOVIE GUIDE. In 2005 he wrote all the Roy Rogers and Gene Autry film reviews for Leonard Maltin s CLASSIC MOVIE GUIDE. In 1994 he began self-publishing WESTERN CLIPPINGS which has become the primary source and authority for thousands of western readers. He also self-publishes SERIAL REPORT. Knowledgeable about all phases of western films, over the last fifteen years Boyd has moderated nearly 200 western celebrity guest star discussion panels at western film festivals all over the country. In addition, Boyd currently has over 2,500 reviews and observations ( The Best and Worst of the West ) of western films online at Chuck Anderson s Old Corral. Boyd s first book, WESTERNS WOMEN, was published by McFarland in 1999 and was followed in 2002 by LADIES OF THE WESTERN. SO YOU WANT TO SEE COWBOY STUFF was his third book in 2003, followed by THE FILMS OF AUDIE MURPHY in 2004 and BEST OF THE BADMEN in 2005. Boyd is dedicated to preserving the rich heritage and enduring memories of small and big screen westerns and the people who populated them.
Hopalong Cassidy Rides Again$29.95
Hopalong Cassidy Rides Again
From the Minute you join hoppy, Lucky and California riding down that narrow canyon trail, and California starts daydreamin' about Mary's hot apple pie and golden fried chicken you'll be hooked! Well, hang on tight, pard...you're in for one heck of a ride! 
Arcadia - Images of America: Bishop$21.99
Arcadia - Images of America: Bishop
Bishop, California   Located in the stark landscape of Eastern California’s Owens Valley, Bishop is situated between two of the highest mountain ranges of the continuous United States.  Native Americans had been in the region since antiquity, and white settlers began to filter in after many battles with the Paiutes and Shoshones.  Bishop was named after Sam Bishop, who drove cattle into the area and settled along Bishop Creek.  Many more farmers and ranchers followed.  To the South, Los Angeles was growing too, tapping the Owens River for a gravity-fed aqueduct for its residents; thus began the Los Angeles – Owens Valley water conflict.
Arcadia - Images of America: Bodie$21.99
Arcadia - Images of America: Bodie
  Nestled amongst the sage-covered, windswept hills of California’s Eastern Sierra is the site of the most notorious mining town’s of the Old West.  In 1859, gold was discovered in the treeless hills northeast of Mono Lake.  By 1879, Bodie was a metropolis of nearly 10,000 souls and was briefly the third-largest city in California.  Excitement was short lived, however, and word soon spread that the mines had reached peak production.  An exodus began, but contrary to popular belief, Bodie was never totally abandoned.  People continued living in this curios and beautiful place throughout the 1950’s and in 1962, the California State Parks system purchased the town site.  Now stabilized against the elements, Bodie is today known as the largest unrestored ghost town in the West.
Arcadia - Images of America: Cemeteries of the Eastern Sierra$21.99
Arcadia - Images of America: Cemeteries of the Eastern Sierra
California’s eastern Sierra region, encompassing Inyo and Mono Counties, is a paradise of striking contrast and beauty.  Early settlers came to this area – now known chiefly for recreational activities such as fishing, hiking and skiing – for its mining and agricultural prospects.  Towns like Bodie, Lundy, and Keeler rose with the promise of quick riches but failed when the promise dimmed. Throughout this unique landscape are sprinkled the poignant resting places of early pioneers.  Reflecting the diversity of the natural setting, the area’s cemeteries range from the Mono County Cemetery overlooking Mono Lake to the overgrown cemetery at the Civil War – era Fort Independence to the garden cemeteries of Bishop.  The monuments in these cemeteries, along with the beautiful country that surrounds them, honor the men and women who once carved lives out of this rugged wilderness.
Arcadia - Images of America: Death Valley$21.99
Arcadia - Images of America: Death Valley
Death Valley, California Death Valley, it’s harsh and rugged landscape established a national monument in 1933 and named a national park in 1944, has long held a fascination for visitors, even before it became tourist friendly.  Shortly after the first visit of nonnative inhabitants, a party of forty-niners looking for a shortcut to the goldfields of California crossed this land with tragic results; inadvertently giving the valley it’s moniker.  Despite the immense suffering in the midst, prospectors began exploring the area looking for mineral wealth.  Boomtowns formed, prospered, and died all within a few years, most disappearing completely into the desert.  Adding to Death Valley’s mystique was the shameless self-promotion of Death Valley Scotty, which lasted for a period spanning more than 50 years.
Arcadia - Images of America: Lone Pine$21.99
Arcadia - Images of America: Lone Pine
Lone Pine’s history is as dramatic and violent as the magnificent landscape in which the town is located.  Long before the first white settlers arrived during the Gold Rush, small groups of Piute-Shoshone Indians lived in the area.  With the discovery of Gold and silver, miners and ranchers supplying food for the mines came into violent conflict with the native inhabitants between 1860 and 1865.  In the 1870s, the Cerro Gordo mines (the largest silver strike in the state) buoyed the growth of Los Angeles.  At the turn of the century, the City of Los Angeles clandestinely bought up land and water rights and initiated a period of conflict with the Owens Valley.  In the 1920’s Hollywood discovered the Sierra Nevada Mountains and high deserts of the area. Over 500 films and countless commercials have been filmed in Lone Pine, featuring such stars as John Wayne, Gene Autry, Errol Flynn, Tyrone Power, Rita Hayworth, Barbara Stanwick and Brad Pitt.
Arcadia - Images of America: Mt, Whitney$21.99
Arcadia - Images of America: Mt, Whitney
The history of Mount Whitney is long, complex, and revealing. Identified in 1864 and named for the head of the California Geological Survey, Mount Whitney is the tallest mountain in the lower 48 states. Throughout the years, it challenged several accomplished mountaineers who failed to reach its summit; it was as if the mountain were working to confuse and impede them. Finally, the mountain was climbed from the west side by three fishermen from Lone Pine. Mount Whitney has always called to the adventurous heart of the climber. Gustave Marsh put in the trail to the summit and then built the Smithsonian Observatory. Writers and artists have applied their talents to capturing elements of the Whitney experience, and there is fascinating geological, natural, and cultural history that rounds out this original approach to the story of a mountain.   Author Bio: Christopher Langley is a film historian, writer, a practicing Inyo County film commissioner, and executive director of the Lone Pine Film History Museum. He is the author of Images of America: Lone Pine, also by Arcadia Publishing. Michael Prather is a retired educator and longtime conservationist in the Eastern Sierra. He has decades of history with the Toiyabe Chapter of the Sierra Club, Eastern Sierra Audubon Society, the Owens Valley Committee, and Friends of the Inyo.
Arcadia - Images of America: Owens Valley$21.99
Arcadia - Images of America: Owens Valley
The Owens Valley is a bold and beautiful land where rugged alpine peaks tower over the deep trough of high desert that John Muir called “a country of wonderful contrasts.” Inhabiting a rich and complex past are native people, miners, cattlemen, farmers, and city builders who laid claim, often violently, to its resources. By 1913, Owens River water was flowing south through the Los Angeles Aqueduct, and from the long and bitter conflicts that followed emerged an Owens Valley future far removed from the agrarian Eden envisioned by 19th-century pioneers. Today, unparalleled recreational opportunities draw millions of visitors annually to this “long brown land” even as reminders of a quintessential Western past linger in its open vistas, epic landscape, and enduring traditions. Author Bio: Historian and Owens Valley native Jane Wehrey has authored Voices From This Long Brown Land: Oral Recollections of Owens Valley Lives and Manzanar Pasts and Images of America: Manzanar. For Images of America: The Owens Valley, she has tapped the extensive archives of the Eastern California Museum and other collections. Represented is the work of Andrew Forbes, Burton Frasher, Allen Ramsey, and other photographers, both professional and amateur, who have been captivated by the rich texture of life and landscape in the Owens Valley.

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Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick - The Life and Times of William A.$19.99
Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick - The Life and Times of William A.
As a restless young man early in World War I, William A. Wellman joined the French Foreign Legion, and then became an ace American pilot with the famed Lafayette Escadrille. After being shot down and suffering grave injuries, the war hero returned to civilian life in Hollywood in the 1920s, soon becoming known as Wild Bill for his maverick perspective and two-fisted approach to directing. As the excellent documentary Wild Bill: Hollywood Maverick details, Wellman's insistence on realistic filmmaking resulted in the still-breathtaking aerial choreography in his breakthrough film, 1927's Wings, the very first Best Picture Oscar Winner. His other films, especially war pictures such as The Story of G.I. Joe, Beau Geste, and Battleground, display equal parts authenticity, grit, and humanity. Wellman also broke out of war-picture confines to have huge success with films such as A Star Is Born (for which he won his only Oscar, for co-writing the script), the screwball comedy Nothing Sacred (both available on DVD and Blu-ray from Kino Classics), and the meditative antilynching drama The Ox-Bow Incident. Wild Bill traces Wellman's extraordinary career, highlighted by interviews with such varied Wellman stars as Robert Mitchum, Buddy Rogers, Burgess Meredith, Clint Eastwood, and Nancy Davis Reagan. Fans of Hollywood history and film in general won't want to miss this fascinating portrait of a true iconoclast. NARRATED BY ALEC BALDWIN (NBC s ''30 Rock'', The Departed, The Hunt For Red October, Rock of Ages). Released on VHS in 1995 Wellman, a daring fighter pilot seriously wounded in World War I, was not easily cowed by the brutality of this Hollywood studio system. He fought his way, often with both fists, carving out film classics such as: PUBLIC ENEMY, (1931) A STAR IS BORN, (1937) NOTHING SACRED, (1937) BEAU GESTE, (1939) THE OX-BOW INCIDENT, (1943) THE STORY OF G.I. JOE, (1945) YELLOW SKY, (1945) BATTLEGROUND, (1949) THE HIGH AND MIGHTY, (1954) The superb documentary is highlighted by 28 interviews with icons of yesterday and today including: Robert Redford Clint Eastwood Robert Mitchum Gregory Peck Sidney Poitier Nancy Reagan Martin Scorcese Richard Widmark Robert Wise …. and many, many more.
Lone Pine: Where The Real West Becomes The Reel West$9.99
Lone Pine: Where The Real West Becomes The Reel West
Lone Pine: Where the Real West Becomes the Real West   From the 1920s into the 1960s, Lone Pine was Hollywood’s favorite place to shoot Westerns. Just about everyone who starred in a western worked regularly in Lone Pine: Gene Autry, William Boyd (Hopalong Cassidy), John Wayne, Randolph Scott, Audie Murphy, Roy Rogers, Gary Cooper—the list goes on and on. Also, many popular television series from the 1950s and 1960s filmed near Lone Pine—The Lone Ranger, Have Gun Will Travel, Wagon Train, and Bonanza among many. Hollywood also found the Alabama hills a perfect landscape for adventure movies with “foreign” settings such as Gunga Din King of the Khyber Rifle, and more recently, Iron Man. In addition, ‘the rocks’, as locals call them, have figured in Gladiator, Dinosaur, two of the Star Trek movies, and various commercials.   This 15 minute short film; Lone Pine: Where The Real West Becomes The Reel West, is a perfect start for your Lone Pine Museum experience and your adventure into its ‘back lot’, the Alabama Hills. Thousands of visitors have enjoyed this little film and its ending melody from the Statler Brothers’ “Whatever Happened to Randolph Scott?” resonating with the visual memories of their youth.   Now, this video is available for your own personal collection for just $9.99.   AVAILABLE FROM OUR GIFT SHOP MAY 1ST
The Trail Beyond$19.98
The Trail Beyond
Loosely based on a story by pulp writer James Oliver Curwood, this Lone Star Western released by Monogram starred a young John Wayne helping an old family friend (James Marcus) find his long-lost brother and niece. Traveling by train to the Canadian Northwest, Rod Drew (Wayne) is reacquainted with old school chum Wabi (Noah Beery Jr.), a "half-breed" falsely accused of shooting a card shark. Escaping the law, the two friends find their way to Wabinosh General Store, whose gregarious owner, Newsome (Noah Beery), is in possession of a map leading to the whereabouts of the missing Ball family and a fortune in gold. A nefarious French trapper, LaRocque (Robert Frazer), is also interested in the map but Drew and Wabi beat him to the location of John Ball's abandoned cabin. Ball himself is long dead but a portrait proves that his daughter is none other than Felice (Verna Hillie), the adopted daughter of the general store owner. Felice and Rod have fallen in love, however, and after delivering the villains to the mounted police, they leave the Northwest together. A remake of the silent The Wolf Hunters (1926), The Trail Beyond was filmed at majestic Kings Canyon National Park in central California and includes several impressive stunts performed by Yakima Canutt and Eddie Parker. (One stunt that failed -- a transfer from horse to wagon -- was left in the film, adding a rare touch of realism to the proceedings.) The beautifully restored version of the film comes complete with a new background score, a nuisance to purists, perhaps, but a welcome addition for the more casual viewer. A colorized version is also available. Monogram filmed the story a third time, as The Wolf Hunters (1949) and starring Kirby Grant. ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi
Hopalong Cassidy: Volume Three$6.99
Hopalong Cassidy: Volume Three
William Boyd. Includes In Old Colorado (1941/66 min.), Leather Burners (1943/58 min.), Stagecoach War (1940/63 min.), Sinister Journey (1948/59 min.) and The Showdown (1940/65 min.). B&w/NR/fullscreen.
Hopalong Cassidy, Vol. 2 (2004)$6.99
Hopalong Cassidy, Vol. 2 (2004)
William Boyd. Includes Pirates on Horseback (1941/69 min.), Borrowed Trouble (1948/58 min.), Dangerous Venture (1947/59 min.), False Colors (1943/65 min.) and The Devil's Playground (1946/65 min.). B&w/NR/fullscreen.  
How the West Was Won$20.97
How the West Was Won
Filmed in panoramic Cinerama, this star-studded, epic Western adventure is a true cinematic classic. Three legendary directors (Henry Hathaway, John Ford, and George Marshall) combine their skills to tell the story of three families and their travels from the Erie Canal to California between 1839 and 1889. Spencer Tracy narrates the film, which cost an estimated 15 million dollars to complete. In the first segment, "The Rivers," pioneer Zebulon Prescott (Karl Malden) sets out to settle in the West with his wife (Agnes Moorehead) and their four children. Along with other settlers and river pirates, they run into mountain man Linus Rawlings (James Stewart), who sells animal hides. The Prescotts try to raft down the Ohio River in a raft, but only daughters Lilith (Debbie Reynolds) and Eve (Carroll Baker) survive. Eve and Linus get married, while Lilith continues on. In the second segment, "The Plains," Lilith ends up singing in a saloon in St. Louis, but she really wants to head west in a wagon train led by Roger Morgan (Robert Preston). Along the way, she's accompanied by the roguish gambler Cleve Van Valen (Gregory Peck), who claims he can protect her. After he saves her life during an Indian attack, they get married and move to San Francisco. In the third segment, "The Civil War," Eve and Linus' son, Zeb (George Peppard), fights for the Union. After he's forced to kill his Confederate friend, he returns home and gives the family farm to his brother. In the fourth segment, "The Railroads," Zeb fights with his railroad boss (Richard Widmark), who wants to cut straight through Indian territory. Zeb's co-worker Jethro (Henry Fonda) refuses to cut through the land, so he quits and moves to the mountains. After the railway camp is destroyed, Zeb heads for the mountains to visit him. In the fifth segment, "The Outlaws," Lilith is an old widow traveling from California to Arizona to stay with her nephew Zeb on his ranch. However, he has to fight a gang of desperadoes first. How the West Was Won garnered three Oscars, for screenplay, film editing, and sound production. ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi
Cat Ballou$14.99
Cat Ballou
This musical spoof of Westerns featured Lee Marvin in dual roles that won him a Best Actor Oscar. Jane Fonda stars as the title character, a prim schoolmarm returning to her hometown of Wolf City, Wyoming, after receiving an Eastern education. On the train ride, Cat meets up with a pair of friendly, charming crooks, Clay Boone (Michael Callan) and his uncle, Jed (Dwayne Hickman), the former becoming hopelessly smitten with the naive but tough Cat. Upon arriving home, Cat discovers that her eccentric father, Frankie (John Marley), is being threatened with bodily harm by a development company that desperately wants his land. When Frankie is murdered by ruthless, noseless killer Tim Strawn (Marvin), Cat straps on a pair of six-shooters and persuades Clay, Jed, and her father's loyal Native American hand Jackson Two-Bears (Tom Nardini) to sign on as her posse. In her quest for revenge, Cat also recruits Kid Shelleen (also played by Marvin), a one-time fearsome gunslinger who's now a hopeless alcoholic. Cat Ballou (1965) is interspersed throughout the narrative with appearances by Stubby Kaye and Nat King Cole as a pair of balladeers who comment on the action musically in Greek chorus style. ~ Karl Williams, Rovi  
The Violent Men$14.99
The Violent Men
Rudolphe Mat directs the western The Violent Men, based on the novel Rough Company by Donald Hamilton. Edward G. Robinson plays Lee Wilkison, the bad-guy owner of Anchor Ranch with a plan to buy out all the smaller ranches to gain control of the valley. Barbara Stanwyck plays his wife Martha, who secretly has an affair with his brother, Cole (Brian Keith). Meanwhile, Cole hangs out with hired gun Wade Matlock (Richard Jaeckel) and his other girlfriend, Elena (Lita Milan). Glenn Ford plays ex-military man John Parrish, the good-guy small ranch owner who is willing to sell until one of his ranch hands turns up dead. He fights back with a vengance using his military training and sets his eyes on Wilkison's daughter, Judith (Dianne Foster). ~ Andrea LeVasseur, Rovi  
The Long, Long Trailer$0.00
The Long, Long Trailer
Besides making television history as the producers and stars of television's immensely popular I Love Lucy and The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, Lucille Ball and her husband, Desi Arnaz, starred in three quite agreeable feature films. The second of these, 1954'sThe Long, Long Trailer, in gorgeous Technicolor and directed by Vincente Minnelli, is a somewhat allegorical tale of a newly married couple who invest in a 40-foot trailer as their first home--and immediately regret it. Well, at least Arnaz's character does; he's the one who has anxiety attacks over operating electric brakes while steering up and down one-lane, mountain roads. Sight gags are plentiful: a scene in which Ball tries to make beef stew, a Caesar salad, and cake in a wobbling, moving trailer is classic Lucy. But there are some genuine dramatic sequences in this handsome movie, too, and the stars rise to the occasion. --Tom Keogh (Amazon) Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz live slaphappily ever after as newlyweds honeymooning in The Long, Long Trailer, breezily directed by Vincente Minnelli. They quickly find that the interior of a moving trailer is ideal for tossing a Caesar salad - and everything else. That backing up their 40-foot, three-ton home is only a little more difficult than threading a needle wearing boxing gloves. And that trailer-park folks are neighborly sorts who turn the lovebirds' rig into the wrong, wrong trailer by crashing the wedding night. Co-starring comedy pros Marjorie Main and Keenan Wynn (Ball's frequent co-star in her MGM days), this smash was filmed at the height of the I Love Lucy craze and is packed with the inventive sight gags and physical humor that made the series a TV landmark. If you like the Trailer, you're going to love the movie!   
Transformers$14.99
Transformers
"I bought a car. Turned out to be an alien robot. Who knew?" deadpans Sam Witwicky, hero and human heart of Michael Bay's rollicking robot-smackdown fest,Transformers. Witwicky (the sweetly nerdy Shia LaBeouf, channeling a young John Cusack) is the perfect counterpoint to the nearly nonstop exhilarating action. The plot is simple: an alien civil war (the Autobots vs. the evil Decepticons) has spilled onto Earth, and young Sam is caught in the fray by his newly purchased souped-up Camaro. Which has a mind--and identity, as a noble-warrior robot named Bumblebee--of its own. The effects, especially the mind-blowing transformations of the robots into their earthly forms and back again, are stellar. Fans of the earlier film and TV series will be thrilled at this cutting-edge incarnation, but this version should please all fans of high-adrenaline action. Director Bay gleefully salts the movie with homages to pop-culture touchstones like Raiders of the Lost Ark,King Kong, and the early technothriller WarGames. The actors, though clearly all supporting those kickass robots, are uniformly on-target, including the dashing Josh Duhamel as a U.S. Army sergeant fighting an enemy he never anticipated; Jon Voight, as a tough yet sympathetic Secretary of Defense in over his head; and John Turturro, whose special agent manages to be confidently unctuous, even stripped to his undies. But the film belongs to Bumblebee, Optimus Prime, and the dastardly Megatron--and the wicked stunts they collide in all over the globe. Long live Transformers! --A.T. Hurley (Amazon)
Bad Day at Black Rock$19.97
Bad Day at Black Rock
One of the first Hollywood films to deal openly with white racism toward Japanese Americans during World War II, this drama directed by 1950s action maestro John Sturges (The Great Escape) stars Spencer Tracy as a one-armed stranger named MacReedy, who arrives in the tiny town of Black Rock on a hot day in 1945. Seeking a hotel room and the whereabouts of an ethnic Japanese farmer named Komoko, MacReedy runs smack into a wall of hostility that escalates into serious threats. In time it becomes apparent that Komoko has been murdered by a local, racist chieftain, Reno Smith (Robert Ryan), who also plans on dispensing with MacReedy. Tracy's hero is forced to fight his way past Smith's goons (among them Ernest Borgnine and Lee Marvin) and sundry allies (Anne Francis) to keep alive, setting the stage for memorable suspense crisply orchestrated by Sturges. Casting is the film's principal strength, however: Tracy, the indispensable icon of integrity, and Ryan, the indispensable noir image of spiritual blight, are as creatively unlikely a pairing as Sturges's shotgun marriage of Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen in The Magnificent Seven. --Tom Keogh ( Amazon)  
Seven Men from Now$7.99
Seven Men from Now
Not many Westerns can claim to be original. Seven Men from Now can. Its making, for the B-picture arm of John Wayne's Batjac company, was a modest enterprise. The screenwriter, Burt Kennedy, was just starting out; the director, Budd Boetticher, was a matador-turned-filmmaker with only one film of distinction (The Bullfighter and the Lady) in a journeyman career; the star, Randolph Scott, was regarded as "over the hill." Yet the three men's talents blended uncannily, producing not just a terrific Western but a cinema masterpiece--an ironical, beautifully spare bit of storytelling that became the ideal showcase for Scott's sandy reticence. You don't want anybody synopsizing the story for you; there's little of it, really, yethow it's told makes it complex and compelling. We know, from a memorable first scene, that Scott is hunting down seven men who did something terrible. He will be thrown together with several other characters, including Lee Marvin as an affable but deadly rascal with whom he shares some history. Everybody has private reasons to be traveling through Apache country. Savor every syllable of the laconic dialogue, what people say and what they don't quite say--what they think they understand about one another's motives, except that that understanding keeps getting rearranged. Seven Men from Now went missing after Wayne's death in 1979 threw the Batjac library into limbo. (Its success had inspired Scott, Boetticher, and Kennedy to collaborate on three other remarkable Westerns--The Tall T (1957), Ride Lonesome(1959), and Comanche Station (1960)--which, because they weren't made for Batjac, we've had little trouble seeing over the years.) The movie became legendary, a Holy Grail for film buffs. Now, with a beautiful restoration on DVD, it gets to be a movie again. A great one. --Richard T. Jameson Randolph Scott, Gail Russell, Lee Marvin. A Wells Fargo robbery leaves the wife of a former sheriff dead. Haunted by this, he seeks out the seven men responsible in order to avenge her death. 1956/color/78 min/NR/widescreen.  
Iron Man$19.97
Iron Man
From Marvel Studios and Paramount Pictures comes Iron Man, an action-packed take on the tale of wealthy philanthropist Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.), who develops an invulnerable robotic suit to fight the throes of evil. In addition to being filthy rich, billionaire industrialist Tony Stark is also a genius inventor. When Stark is kidnapped and forced to build a diabolical weapon, he instead uses his intelligence and ingenuity to construct an indestructible suit of armor and escape his captors. Once free, Stark discovers a deadly conspiracy that could destabilize the entire globe, and dons his powerful new suit on a mission to stop the villains and save the world. Gwyneth Paltrow co-stars as his secretary, Virginia "Pepper" Potts, while Terrence Howard fills the role of Jim "Rhodey" Rhodes, one of Stark's colleagues, whose military background leads him to help in the formation of the suit. Jon Favreau directs, with Marvel movie veterans Avi Arad and Kevin Feige producing. ~ Jeremy Wheeler, Rovi  
Gunga Din$19.97
Gunga Din
Though Rudyard Kipling's poem Gunga Din makes a swell recital piece, it cannot be said to have much of a plot. It's simply a crude cockney soldier's tribute to a native Indian water boy who remains at his job even after being mortally wounded. Hardly the sort of material upon which to build 118 minutes' worth of screen time-at least, it wasn't until RKO producer Pandro S. Berman decided to convert Gunga Din into an A-budgeted feature film. Now it became the tale of three eternally brawling British sergeants stationed in colonial India: Cutter (Cary Grant), McChesney (Victor McLaglen) and Ballantine (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.). Ballantine intends to break up the threesome by marrying lovely Emmy Stebbins (Joan Fontaine), while Cutter and McChesney begin hatching diabolical schemes to keep Ballantine in the army (if this plot element sounds a lot like something from the Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur play The Front Page, bear in mind that Hecht and McArthur shared writing credit on Gunga Din with Joel Sayre and Fred Guiol; also contributing to the screenplay, uncredited, was William Faulkner). All three sergeants are kept occupied with a native revolt fomented by the Thuggees, a fanatical religious cult headed by a Napoleonic Guru (Eduardo Ciannelli). Unexpectedly coming to the rescue of our three heroes-not to mention every white man, woman and child in the region-is humble water carrier Gunga Din (Sam Jaffe), who aspires to become the regimental trumpeter. Originally slated to be directed by Howard Hawks, Gunga Din was taken out of Hawks' hands when the director proved to be too slow during the filming of Bringing Up Baby. His replacement was George Stevens, who proved to be slower and more exacting than Hawks had ever been! ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi
High Plains Drifter$14.98
High Plains Drifter
"Who are you?" the dwarf Mordecai (Billy Curtis) asks Clint Eastwood's Stranger at the end of Eastwood's 1973 western High Plains Drifter. "You know," he replies, before vanishing into the desert heat waves near California's Mono Lake. Adapting the amorally enigmatic and violent Man With No Name persona from his films with Sergio Leone, Eastwood's second film as director begins as his drifter emerges from that heat haze and rides into the odd lakefront settlement of Lago. Lago's residents are not particularly friendly, but once the Stranger shows his skills as a gunfighter, they beg him to defend them against a group of outlaws (led by Eastwood regular Geoffrey Lewis) who have a score to settle with the town. He agrees to train them in self-defense, but Mordecai and innkeeper's wife Sarah Belding (Verna Bloom) soon suspect that the Stranger has another, more personal agenda. By the time the Stranger makes the corrupt community paint their town red and re-name it "Hell," it is clear that he is not just another gunslinger. With its fragmented flashbacks and bizarre, austere locations, High Plains Drifter's stylistic eccentricity lends an air of unsettling eeriness to its revenge story, adding an uncanny slant to Eastwood's antiheroic westerner. Seminal western hero John Wayne was so offended by Eastwood's harshly revisionist view of a frontier town that he wrote to Eastwood, objecting that this was not what the spirit of the West was all about. Eastwood's audience, however, was not so put off, and an exhibitors' poll named Eastwood a top box-office draw for 1973. ~ Lucia Bozzola, Rovi  
Joe Kidd$9.99
Joe Kidd
In John Sturges'sAmericanized version of Sergio Leone's Man-With-No-Name films, Clint Eastwood is Joe Kidd, a cryptic stranger who arrives in the New Mexican town of Sinola, where Mexican bandito/revolutionary Luis Chama (John Saxon) has organized a peasant revolt against the local landowners, who are throwing the poor off land that rightfully belongs to them. When a posse -- financed by wealthy landowner Frank Harlan (Robert Duvall) -- is formed to capture Luis, Kidd is invited to join but prefers to remain neutral. Harlan keeps badgering Kidd to join up, and Kidd finally relents when he finds that Luis's band has raided his own ranch and one of his ranch hands has been injured. The bloodthirsty posse rounds up five Mexicans hostages and threaten to kill them unless Luis surrenders to them. One of the hostages is the attractive Stella Garcia (Helen Sanchez), and Kidd falls in love with her. Harlan notices this and throws Kidd in jail to prevent him from helping Stella and the Mexicans. Kidd decides the position himself as the voice of reason in this nest of disorder. He escapes and saves the Mexican hostages, determined to capture Luis himself and see that he gets a fair trial. But when Kidd captures Luis and delivers him to Sheriff Mitchell (Gregory Walcott), Harlan is in town waiting for him. ~ Paul Brenner, Rovi  
Tremors$14.98
Tremors
Tremors is actually two movies in one. On its own terms, it's an enjoyable modern sci-fi horror-thriller, with good pacing and a sense of humor; but it's also a loving tribute to such 1950s low-budget desert-based sci-fi-horror films like Them!, It Came From Outer Space, Tarantula, and The Monolith Monsters. Kevin Bacon and Fred Ward are the stars, a pair of small-town handymen living in a small desert community, who stumble upon several difficult-to-explain phenomena, including a couple of people who've died under extremely strange (and, in one instance, very grisly) circumstances. Eventually, they and a handful of their neighbors find the cause: gigantic prehistoric worm-like creatures that streak under the desert the way fish swim through oceans, reaching up and grabbing anything they need for food. Cut off from the outside world, they have to figure out how to get across the desert alive while these creatures -- that are smart as well as fast -- close in on them, stalking them like monster sharks. The film benefits from the presence of special effects that are good enough to pull this all off, keeping the shock value high, and also from a subtly humorous script and performances to match by the entire cast, and director Ron Underwood's breezy pacing of the whole picture. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi
Broken Arrow$14.98
Broken Arrow
Delmer Daves's movie about ex–army scout Tom Jeffords's one-man peace mission to the Apaches, and the diplomatic partnership he formed with Cochise, has a child's-storybook clarity to it. That applies to not only its lovely Technicolor compositions but also its scenario, characterizations, and still-arresting mix of violence and delicacy.Broken Arrow wasn't the first Western to express sympathy for the Indian side in the frontier wars (Devil's Doorway came out earlier in 1950 and filed a more scathing brief on the Indians' behalf), but it was Daves's picture that had a decisive impact on popular consciousness and effectively amended the ground rules of the genre. James Stewart's Jeffords may be less compelling than the troubled Westerners the star would soon be playing for Anthony Mann, but there's real tenderness and vulnerability in the performance. Jeff Chandler scored a supporting-actor Oscar® nomination for leavening the dignity of Cochise with sly humor. --Richard T. JamesonIn 1870, when white men and Indians are fighting bitterly, Tom Jeffords (Stewart) strongly believes the Apaches are treated unfairly. After befriending their leader Cochise (Jeff Chandler) and arranging a truce, he is called upon by a U.S. Army general to negotiate a government peace treaty. Though he fulfills his mission, Jeffords soon experiences great tragedy when he, his Indian wife (Debra Paget) and good friend Cochise become targets of a renegade ambush.
Yellow Sky$14.98
Yellow Sky
It seems no one has ever had an unkind word for Yellow Sky, yet somehow this handsome, hard-edged, and very well-made late-'40s Western remains little-known. That may change with its release on a DVD so crisp and luminous, one wants to swear off Technicolor and luxuriate in the frosty glow of its highlights, the velvet blackness of its shadows, and the electric silver-gray of its desert skies. Story's pretty good, too. Seven men led by Gregory Peck ride into a small Southwest town, wet their whistles at the saloon, then hold up the bank with a minimum of fuss. Escaping should be a cinch, except for a troop of cavalry who reduce their number to six and watch the survivors ride off into a desert they probably won't live to cross. Unexpected salvation looms in the form of Yellow Sky, a ghost town where the bandits find water, an old man (James Barton) and his tomboy granddaughter (Anne Baxter)--and the tempting rumor of gold. That's when the real trouble starts. The criminal partnership is severely strained by greed, several varieties of lust (for the girl as well as the treasure), the troublesome onset of conscience in some breasts and its total absence from others--notably Richard Widmark's. Yellow Sky re-teams director William A. Wellman and writer-producer Lamar Trotti, who five years earlier had made The Ox-Bow Incident, an authentic but rather pretentious Western classic. Yellow Sky's opening scene is all but lifted from Ox-Bow(along with two character actors), but this time around, Wellman eschews self-importance and just concentrates on spinning a gritty yarn (from a novel by W.R. Burnett). Apart from sequences shot in Death Valley, the principal location is Yellow Sky itself, a grand ruin set against the timeless backdrop of the Alabama Hills. And oh yes, the man responsible for those awesome whites, blacks, and silver-grays is Joe MacDonald, the cinematographer of My Darling Clementine. --Richard T. Jameson (Amazon) Oscar®-winner* Gregory Peck (To Kill A Mockingbird) stars in this ?brilliantly cast? (The Hollywood Reporter) Western epic featuring ?an unusually fine story and magnificent direction ? unleashing dramatic power seldom found in this type of film!? (Daily Variety) A band of outlaws, led by tough, gruff Stretch (Peck) find themselves knocking at death?s door after becoming lost in the treacherous western Badlands ? only to find their salvation in a lonesome town called Yellow Sky, where the only inhabitants are a doddering old man and his mysterious, alluring daughter. But their deliverance from danger is short-lived when the gang discovers a fateful secret hidden within the dusty, rotting walls of this ghost town ? one that will turn brother against brother in a desperate battle to the death!  
Rocketship X-M$9.97
Rocketship X-M
Synopsis The 50th Anniversary Edition of Kurt Neumann's science fiction classic. Four men and a girl blast into space on mankind's first expedition to the Moon. But due to a cataclysmic event in space, their ship is sent hurling out of control towards the planet Mars. Suspenseful terror as the crew fights for their life on a war-ravaged world with radiation-riddled nightmare creatures! The climax makes this one of the most powerful and unforgettable science fiction movies ever made. "Rocketship X-M" was deftly brought to the screen by famed writer/director Kurt Neumann. Long considered the definitive space exploration film of the 50's, a genuine classic with a power that has spanned the decades. Product Notes Lloyd Bridges, Hugh O'Brian. Expedition Moon" is on course for the moon until it encounters a catastrophe that sends it to Mars instead! A landmark science-fiction adventure that was one of the first to depict space travel dramatically. 1950/b&w/77 min/NR/fullscreen. Product Reviews Together with The Steel Helmet and Baron of Arizona, Rocketship X M is one of the best films ever turned out by the usually unimpressive Lippert Studios. Set sometime in the future, the film details the first manned space flight to the moon. John Emery plays the head of the expedition, with Lloyd Bridges, Osa Massen, Hugh O'Brian and Noah Beery Jr. in the crew. Blown off its course by a meteor shower, Rocketship X-M misses the moon and lands on Mars instead (the Mars scenes were originally tinted pink). During an exploratory expedition, the crew finds evidence of a once-mighty civilization, evidently destroyed by atomic warfare. A savage band of surviving Martians attack the earthlings, killing two and wounding a third. The survivors head back to the ship, but run out of fuel before reaching Earth. Out of this failure springs the hope that future space flights will prove successful. Generally avoiding cliches (except for the stereotypical comedy relief by Noah Beery Jr.), Rocketship X M is a reasonably intelligent outer-space yarn. While it's true that the film falters in the scientific-accuracy department, it is best to assess the film within the context of its times. Produced for $94,000, Rocketship X M reportedly grossed over a million dollars. A "restored" video version with new special effects was released in 1976 by entrepreneur Wade Williams. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi  
Ride the High Country$19.97
Ride the High Country
This Sam Peckinpah-directed feature outing was intended as the cinematic swan song for both Randolph Scott and Joel McCrea; while McCrea would unexpectedly emerge from retirement, this 1961 western serves as an excellent valedictory for both men. The time is the early 1900s, when the Old West was slowly and stubbornly giving way to the new. McCrea plays Steve Judd, an ex-lawman living on the fringes of poverty but maintaining his dignity and honesty. Hired to escort a gold shipment from the wide-open mining town of Coarse Gold, he engages his old pal Gil Westrum (Scott) to help him. But Gil hasn't Steve's integrity, and he and his young saddle pal Heck Longtree (Ronald Starr) hope to talk Steve into helping them steal the gold. En route to Coarse Gold, the three riders spend the night at the farm of a religious fanatic (R.G. Armstrong), whose daughter Elsa (Mariette Hartley in her film debut), chafing at her father's loud piety, is planning to elope with her boyfriend Billy (James Drury). The next day, Elsa insists on joining up with the group so she can marry Billy at Coarse Gold, leading to numerous complications and, of course, a final shoot-out that allows Steve and Gil to reconcile their differences and pave the way for the film's elegiac finale. Released at the tail end of the western genre, and virtually thrown away by MGM, Ride the High Country feels like an elegy for the western itself -- and Peckinpah himself would go on to revise western conventions with such later efforts as The Wild Bunch (1969) and Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973). ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi  
3 Godfathers$12.97
3 Godfathers
It's hardly shameful that The Three Godfathers ranks as the slightest John Ford Western in a five-year arc that includes My Darling Clementine, Fort Apache, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, Wagon Master, and Rio Grande. The source, a Peter B. Kyne story both hard-bitten and sentimental, had already been filmed at least five times--once by Ford himself as Marked Men (1919). The star of that silent version, Harry Carey, had recently died. This remake is dedicated to him ("Bright Star of the early western sky") and proudly introduces his son, Harry Carey Jr. (who had already appeared in Howard Hawks's Red River--as did his father--but we won't quibble). Just before Christmas, three workaday outlaws (John Wayne, Pedro Armendáriz, Harry Carey Jr.) rob a bank in Welcome, Arizona, and flee into the desert. The canny town marshal (Ward Bond) moves swiftly to cut them off from the wells along their escape route, so they make for another, deep in the wasteland. There's no water waiting for them, but there is a woman (Mildred Natwick) on the verge of death--and also of giving birth. The three badmen accept her dying commission as godfathers to the newborn. Motley variants of the Three Wise Men, they strike out for the town of New Jerusalem with her Bible as roadmap. It becomes increasingly apparent that saving the child's life will cost them their own. Ford's is the softest retelling of the tale; in place of Kyne's bitter/triumphant final twist, he adds a very broad comic postlude. Elsewhere, the nearly sacramental treatment of the mother's death is followed by an extended gosh-almighty sequence of the banditos reading up on childcare. But it's all played with great gusto and tenderness--especially by Wayne, who's rarely been more appealing. Visually the film is one knockout shot after another. This was Ford's first Western in Technicolor, as well as his first collaboration with cinematographer Winton Hoch. What they do with sand ripples and shadows and long plumes of train smoke is rapturously beautiful. It's also often too arty by half, but who can blame them? --Richard T. JamesonFugitive bank robbers Robert (John Wayne), William (Harry Carey Jr.) and Pedro (Pedro Armendariz) stand at a desert grave. Caring for the newborn infant of the woman they just buried will ruin any chance of escape. But they won't go back on their promise to her. They won't abandon little Robert William Pedro. Director John Ford's Western retelling of the Biblical Three Wise Men tale remains a scenic and thematic masterpiece. Ford adds color to his feature-film palette, capturing stunning vistas via cinematographer Winton Hoch, who would win two of his three Academy Awards * for Ford films. Again, populist-minded Ford asserts that even men of dissolute character can follow that inner star of Bethlehem to their own redemption.

Shop Belt Buckles

2013 FESTIVAL BELT BUCKLE - BRONZE$35.00
2013 FESTIVAL BELT BUCKLE - BRONZE
2013 "Where the Real West Becomes the Reel West" Lone Pine Film Festival "Collector's" Bronze Buckle. Each year for over 20 years, our Festival buckle has been cusom designed by a local artist. This year's buckle celebrates "Lone Ranger Canyon," made famous by the ambush of the Texas Rangers by the Cavendish Gang in "The Lone Ranger, Republic serial." The liimited edition buckles are offered in bronze and gold & silver. Past years’ buckles are available for purchase year-round at the Lone Pine Film Museum website and in nour gift shop. Purchase your buckle now and then log onto the Lone Pine Film Festival website to buy your 2013 Festival tickets. Past years’ buckles are available for purchase year-round at the Lone Pine Film Museum website.
1995 Belt Buckle - Bronze$30.00
1995 Belt Buckle - Bronze
1995 Lone Pine Film Festival Bronze Buckle Collector’s Film Festival Belt Buckle. Each buckle is hand designed by local artisan Mike Boyer.  Each year, the Festival has featured a unique design cast in both Bronze and Gold. Past years’ buckles are available for purchase year-round at the Lone Pine Film Museum.
2012 Belt Buckle - GOLD$55.00
2012 Belt Buckle - GOLD
2012 "Celebrate the Centennials"   Lone Pine Film Festival Gold Buckle   Collector’s Film Festival Belt Buckle. Each buckle is hand designed by local artisan  Mike Boyer.  For twenty-two years, the Festival has featured a unique design cast in both Bronze and Gold. Purchase your buckle along with the Festival Tickets and receive your individually numbered collector’s buckle to add to your collection. Past years’ buckles are available for purchase year-round at the Lone Pine Film Museum.  
2012 Belt Buckle - BRONZE$30.00
2012 Belt Buckle - BRONZE
2012 "Celebrate the Centennials" Lone Pine Film Festival Bronze Buckle Collector’s Film Festival Belt Buckle. Each buckle is hand designed by local artisan  Mike Boyer.  For twenty-two years, the Festival has featured a unique design cast in both Bronze and Gold. Purchase your buckle along with the Festival Tickets and receive your individually numbered collector’s buckle to add to your collection. Past years’ buckles are available for purchase year-round at the Lone Pine Film Museum.
2011 Belt Buckle - Gold$55.00
2011 Belt Buckle - Gold
2011 Lone Pine Film Festival Gold Buckle   Collector’s Film Festival Belt Buckle. Each buckle is hand designed by local artisan  Mike Boyer.  For twenty-two years, the Festival has featured a unique design cast in both Bronze and Gold. Purchase your buckle along with the Festival Tickets and receive your individually numbered collector’s buckle to add to your collection. Past years’ buckles are available for purchase year-round at the Lone Pine Film Museum.
2011 Belt Buckle - Bronze$30.00
2011 Belt Buckle - Bronze
2011 Lone Pine Film Festival Bronze Buckle Collector’s Film Festival Belt Buckle. Each buckle is hand designed by local artisan  Mike Boyer.  For twenty-two years, the Festival has featured a unique design cast in both Bronze and Gold. Purchase your buckle along with the Festival Tickets and receive your individually numbered collector’s buckle to add to your collection. Past years’ buckles are available for purchase year-round at the Lone Pine Film Museum.
Audie Murphy Lone Pine Film Festival Belt Buckle Bronze$30.00
Audie Murphy Lone Pine Film Festival Belt Buckle Bronze
Audie Murphy Lone Pine Film Festival Belt Buckle Bronze
Audie Murphy Lone Pine Film Festival Belt Buckle Gold and Silver$59.26
Audie Murphy Lone Pine Film Festival Belt Buckle Gold and Silver
Audie Murphy Lone Pine Film Festival Belt Buckle Gold and Silver
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&nbspThe Museum of Western Film History
701 S. Main Street
Lone Pine, CA 93545
760-876-9909