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GUNGA DIN TOUR DRAFT

Making of Gunga Din
Produced 1938, Lone Pine, California 
Released February 17, 1939 (U.S.) by RKO Pictures
Directed by George Stevens Produced by George Stevens Written by Joel Sayre

                                                                                            Gunga Din Lobby CardGungaDin1939 2 FF 188x141 051520061807

 "Though I've belted you and flayed you,
By the livin' Gawd that made you,
You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!" -
Rudyard Kipling, Gunga Din

Alabama Hills with its interesting rocks and Sierra backdrop has been an inspiration to many a movie with Gunga Din being one of the hallmark movies to be filmed in this area. The movie was filmed in 1938 and premiered in Los Angeles on January 24th 1939.

All the sets were built and filmed in Lone Pine. Interior shots and close ups were filmed in LA’s Bronson Canyon and the studio lot.

Drawing title and inspiration from Rudyard Kipling's 1892 ode to a courageous water bearer, RKO's production of Gunga Din (1939) would be the studio's costliest project at that point in its history. Although RKO's executives may have sweated the cost overruns like the Indian desert heat, this semi-comic adventure tale would become one of their most profitable efforts, and stands as one of the most entertaining action films to ever come out of Hollywood

Background

Many different producers, writers and directors all contributed to the script as we see it today. And other movies inspired and were inspired by it.

In the mid-30s, adventure films set in Colonial India such as Clive of India (1935) and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935) had proven to be tremendous draws. An independent producer named Edward Small found it worth expending $5000 to Kipling's widow for the film rights to his poem, and $750 a week to William Faulkner to flesh it into a screenplay. RKO ultimately bought the property outright from Small, and Faulkner's efforts were handed to Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht for reworking.

Storyline: British army sergeants Ballantine (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.), Cutter (Cary Grant) and MacChesney (Victor McLaglen) serve in India during the 1880s, along with their native water-bearer, Gunga Din (Sam Jaffe). While completing a dangerous telegraph-repair mission, they unearth evidence of the suppressed Thuggee cult. When Gunga Din tells the sergeants about a secret temple made of gold, the fortune-hunting Cutter is captured by the Thuggees, and it's up to his friends to rescue him.

The movie was remade in 1961 as Sergeants 3, starring the Rat Pack. The locale was moved from British-colonial India to the old West. The Gunga Din character was played in this film by Sammy Davis Jr.. Many elements of the 1939 film were also incorporated into Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

The tour will cover the following locations: Ruiz Hill (battle Scenes), Tent City, Tantrapur, The Temple and the Fort.

Film Style
Directed by George Stevens who at the time was known for comedy having worked in silent with Laurel and Hardy. He was considered a quiet sailor, unassuming but strong. Stevens added a few different storylines including the Elephants for drama. The original script was in a very free format with no real referecnes other than the poem.

Cast
Cary Grant – Archie Cutter  UK Born - originally cast for Ballantine’s role requested the more humorous one of Cutter – He and Fairbanks tossed a coin for it –

Gary Grant won - a wise move – he pretty much stole the show from Douglas Fairbanks Jr (Ballantine)  who was assigned that role only 5 days before filming. The continued calling each other by their names in the movie for years.

Victor McLaglen type cast as Captain - Mac Chesney.  Was borrowed from Century Fox - played that role many a time – it was his favorite film (along with another TRK film he did with Shirley Temple – Wee Willie Winkie in 1937. A boxer and a solder in real life

Sam Jaffe was cast for Gunga Din (Sabu Elephant Boy - originally considered but not available)

Joan Fontaine was Emmy Stebbins – a weak performance, she came into her own only after the film Rebecca.

Eduado Giarelli_ Guru – Italian Baratone. Villains in Dr Satan, marked Woman, Strange cargo

Joseph August  - cinematographer

Alfred Newman - composer

Three primary locations were used for sets.

* The temple- Had a gold leaf dome, inside shots were done at studio.
* The parade ground / fort.
* Tantrapur – eight acre set. Was built strong for stunt work. A fire burned the finished set of Tantrapur. 31 carpenters rushed to rebuild in 10 days one of the largest insurance claims of that time in the movie biz. Set was reused by Russ Spainhower for the Anchor Ranch set.

Also -

- Ruiz Hill, off Whitney Portal Road was where many of the battle scenes were shot.       It was a good spot because you could shot two scenes that look very different from the same spot just using a different camera angles.

At least 4 battle scenes were done from this spot.

There were so many people that fleets of busses and trucks brought them here.

They were spray painted on turn tables. Rehearsed the scenes in slow motion in small detachments. Gradually added more and more elements to the mix.

This was a far cry from the time the studio sent a telegram to George Stevens saying he was over budget and to shut down the production.

 - Tent City – this was where the film unit camped. There were not enough hotels for everyone plus Stevens wanted everyone to immerse themselves in the landscape.        It took 4 weeks with 200 crew to set up tent city, the living quarters for the crew that would work on the picture, then 16 cars, 12 trucks 10-30 passenger busses and a large portable film lab arrived to begin work.

The bridge that spans a deep chasm where Annie Mae – the elephant tries to walk on was in fact inches off the ground. In some of the overhead shots the sagebrush is visible in the movie. Look for the iron work still on the rock.

Facts and figures.

Shooting days - 104 days 40 more than the 64 days originally scheduled that stretched out to 104 (10 weeks)

The whole production neared $2 million (One of the highest of that time). Only Gone with the Wind & Hells Angels were comparable)

One point they wanted to stop the production because they were so over budget and schedule with bad weather delaying everything. Stevens received a telegram saying ‘”stop the production” – Fairbanks said “pretend you didn’t receive it.”

People - 300 to 400 consistently in camp.

How much do you need to feed 325 people – EACH DAY?

450 pounds of chicken or 220 whole chickens per meal
200 pounds of potatoes
60 pies
90 gallons of coffee
100 gallons of iced tea
80 gallons of milk
10 gallons of cream
2 bakes busy baking 100 loaves and 100 rolls a day
150 pounds of onions peeled 
and 80 gallons of Lemonade

This equated to:
14 tons of meat and vegetables weekly
500 pounds of ice per day to refrigerate it.
37 commissary staff (13 waiters, 6 janitors, a maintenance man, 17 chefs and 2 full time dish washers.

There was a special post office stamp to denote the camp location. One of the largest movie theaters in the world showing a diff movie each night. (open to all camp residents). Busses rolled into town with the people still in costume so Indians, whiskered Hindus and Scottish officers walking in town.

Equipment: 14 studio cars, 8 busses, 16 camera and equipment trucks, 4 elephants (Main elephant Anna May was 30 years old and played in more movies than Clark Gable!) 8 camels, 1 water buffalo and other small animals. 

Use your mouse to roll-over the pictures below to see Then & Now!

Tent City 1 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tent City #1: The tent city, which featured organized and identified 
streets, like Hollywood and Vine, housed the male cast and crew members. Joan 
Fontaine was housed in Lone Pine.

 
Tent city 2 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tent City #2: The tents were set atop raised wood bases in order to 
allow air to 
circulate better and to restrict wildlife from entering.
 
Fort 6 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Fort #6: Tantrapur-bound telegraph wiring detail departs British 
outpost at Muri. Photo depicts a reset of the departure scene which features first 
on-screen appearance of Sam Jaffe as the title character.
 
Tantrapur 3 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #3: An unoccupied Tantrapur except for the crew truck 
parked 
to the right.
 
Fort 6 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Fort #6: Tantrapur-bound telegraph wiring detail departs British 
outpost at Muri. Photo depicts a reset of the departure scene which features first 
on-screen appearance of Sam Jaffe as the title character.
 
Tantrapur 5 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #5: Beginning of Thug attack on Tantrapur.
 
Tantrapur 2 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #1: The fight in Tantrapur. Sgt. Ballantine (Douglas 
Fairbanks, Jr.) prepares to jump to supply wagon where dynamite is stored.
 
Fort 4 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - FORT #4: Tantrapur telegraph wiring detail (right) returns to 
British outpost at Muri. 
Sgt. MacChesney's (Victor McLaglen) report: “Eight killed,
three wounded. Otherwise all correct.”
 
Fort 5 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN  - Fort #5: Tantrapur telegraph wiring detail dismissed after returning
to British outpost at Muri.
 
Bridge 4 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Bridge: The Bridge to the temple. The actual height at the wooden 
and rope structure's trough was approximately ten feet from the ground, although
the matte shot in the final print suggests the bridge spanned a drop of several 
hundred feet.
 
Temple 1 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Temple #1: Mounted Thugs. Scene not used
 
Temple 4 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Temple #4: Mounted Thugs, the Guru's (Eduardo Ciannelli) 
“household cavalry,” await the approaching British columns. Taken from A-camera 
placed 
atop a wooden parallel (tower).
 
Temple 8 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Temple #8: Organized Thug cavalry and infantry, described by
the Guru (Eduardo Ciannelli) as “the best mountain fighters in the world.”
 
Ruiz Hill 3 36 35 52.908 N 118 5 49 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Ruiz Hill Battle Scene: Vanguard of Scot Highlanders advance through
the Thug-filled 
mountain pass. This shot was not used in the final print.
 
Ruiz Hill 3 36 35 52.908 N 118 5 49 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Ruiz Hill Battle Scene:
Scot Highlanders emerge thorough Ruiz Hill “mountain pass” and charge Thug 
positions at Temple. 
This shot was not used in the final print.
 
Ruiz Hill 1 36 35 51.21 N 118 5 52 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Ruiz Hill Battle Scene:
British Gatling Gun battery location at Ruiz Hill. The artillery pieces used in
the film were actually 
American Gatling Guns which were featured in the film's
final battle.
 
Fairbanks Gatling Gun 36 39 372 N 118 7 42 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Fairbanks & Gatling Gun: [Fairbanks and Gatling Gun] Douglas 
Fairbanks, Jr. at one of the Gatling Guns. This photo was one of a number of 
promotional photographs of the principals taken with the artillery piece.
 
   
Gunga DIn Elephants
Gunga Din - Elephants
 
   
   

GUNGA DIN TOUR TEST

Making of Gunga Din
Produced 1938, Lone Pine, California 
Released February 17, 1939 (U.S.) by RKO Pictures
Directed by George Stevens Produced by George Stevens Written by Joel Sayre

                                                                                            Gunga Din Lobby CardGungaDin1939 2 FF 188x141 051520061807

 "Though I've belted you and flayed you,
By the livin' Gawd that made you,
You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!" -
Rudyard Kipling, Gunga Din

Alabama Hills with its interesting rocks and Sierra backdrop has been an inspiration to many a movie with Gunga Din being one of the hallmark movies to be filmed in this area. The movie was filmed in 1938 and premiered in Los Angeles on January 24th 1939.

All the sets were built and filmed in Lone Pine. Interior shots and close ups were filmed in LA’s Bronson Canyon and the studio lot.

Drawing title and inspiration from Rudyard Kipling's 1892 ode to a courageous water bearer, RKO's production of Gunga Din (1939) would be the studio's costliest project at that point in its history. Although RKO's executives may have sweated the cost overruns like the Indian desert heat, this semi-comic adventure tale would become one of their most profitable efforts, and stands as one of the most entertaining action films to ever come out of Hollywood

Background

Many different producers, writers and directors all contributed to the script as we see it today. And other movies inspired and were inspired by it.

In the mid-30s, adventure films set in Colonial India such as Clive of India (1935) and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935) had proven to be tremendous draws. An independent producer named Edward Small found it worth expending $5000 to Kipling's widow for the film rights to his poem, and $750 a week to William Faulkner to flesh it into a screenplay. RKO ultimately bought the property outright from Small, and Faulkner's efforts were handed to Charles MacArthur and Ben Hecht for reworking.

Storyline: British army sergeants Ballantine (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.), Cutter (Cary Grant) and MacChesney (Victor McLaglen) serve in India during the 1880s, along with their native water-bearer, Gunga Din (Sam Jaffe). While completing a dangerous telegraph-repair mission, they unearth evidence of the suppressed Thuggee cult. When Gunga Din tells the sergeants about a secret temple made of gold, the fortune-hunting Cutter is captured by the Thuggees, and it's up to his friends to rescue him.

The movie was remade in 1961 as Sergeants 3, starring the Rat Pack. The locale was moved from British-colonial India to the old West. The Gunga Din character was played in this film by Sammy Davis Jr.. Many elements of the 1939 film were also incorporated into Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

The tour will cover the following locations: Ruiz Hill (battle Scenes), Tent City, Tantrapur, The Temple and the Fort.

Film Style
Directed by George Stevens who at the time was known for comedy having worked in silent with Laurel and Hardy. He was considered a quiet sailor, unassuming but strong. Stevens added a few different storylines including the Elephants for drama. The original script was in a very free format with no real referecnes other than the poem.

Cast
Cary Grant – Archie Cutter  UK Born - originally cast for Ballantine’s role requested the more humorous one of Cutter – He and Fairbanks tossed a coin for it –

Gary Grant won - a wise move – he pretty much stole the show from Douglas Fairbanks Jr (Ballantine)  who was assigned that role only 5 days before filming. The continued calling each other by their names in the movie for years.

Victor McLaglen type cast as Captain - Mac Chesney.  Was borrowed from Century Fox - played that role many a time – it was his favorite film (along with another TRK film he did with Shirley Temple – Wee Willie Winkie in 1937. A boxer and a solder in real life

Sam Jaffe was cast for Gunga Din (Sabu Elephant Boy - originally considered but not available)

Joan Fontaine was Emmy Stebbins – a weak performance, she came into her own only after the film Rebecca.

Eduado Giarelli_ Guru – Italian Baratone. Villains in Dr Satan, marked Woman, Strange cargo

Joseph August  - cinematographer

Alfred Newman - composer

Three primary locations were used for sets.

* The temple- Had a gold leaf dome, inside shots were done at studio.
* The parade ground / fort.
* Tantrapur – eight acre set. Was built strong for stunt work. A fire burned the finished set of Tantrapur. 31 carpenters rushed to rebuild in 10 days one of the largest insurance claims of that time in the movie biz. Set was reused by Russ Spainhower for the Anchor Ranch set.

Also -

- Ruiz Hill, off Whitney Portal Road was where many of the battle scenes were shot.       It was a good spot because you could shot two scenes that look very different from the same spot just using a different camera angles.

At least 4 battle scenes were done from this spot.

There were so many people that fleets of busses and trucks brought them here.

They were spray painted on turn tables. Rehearsed the scenes in slow motion in small detachments. Gradually added more and more elements to the mix.

This was a far cry from the time the studio sent a telegram to George Stevens saying he was over budget and to shut down the production.

 - Tent City – this was where the film unit camped. There were not enough hotels for everyone plus Stevens wanted everyone to immerse themselves in the landscape.        It took 4 weeks with 200 crew to set up tent city, the living quarters for the crew that would work on the picture, then 16 cars, 12 trucks 10-30 passenger busses and a large portable film lab arrived to begin work.

The bridge that spans a deep chasm where Annie Mae – the elephant tries to walk on was in fact inches off the ground. In some of the overhead shots the sagebrush is visible in the movie. Look for the iron work still on the rock.

Facts and figures.

Shooting days - 104 days 40 more than the 64 days originally scheduled that stretched out to 104 (10 weeks)

The whole production neared $2 million (One of the highest of that time). Only Gone with the Wind & Hells Angels were comparable)

One point they wanted to stop the production because they were so over budget and schedule with bad weather delaying everything. Stevens received a telegram saying ‘”stop the production” – Fairbanks said “pretend you didn’t receive it.”

People - 300 to 400 consistently in camp.

How much do you need to feed 325 people – EACH DAY?

450 pounds of chicken or 220 whole chickens per meal
200 pounds of potatoes
60 pies
90 gallons of coffee
100 gallons of iced tea
80 gallons of milk
10 gallons of cream
2 bakes busy baking 100 loaves and 100 rolls a day
150 pounds of onions peeled 
and 80 gallons of Lemonade

This equated to:
14 tons of meat and vegetables weekly
500 pounds of ice per day to refrigerate it.
37 commissary staff (13 waiters, 6 janitors, a maintenance man, 17 chefs and 2 full time dish washers.

There was a special post office stamp to denote the camp location. One of the largest movie theaters in the world showing a diff movie each night. (open to all camp residents). Busses rolled into town with the people still in costume so Indians, whiskered Hindus and Scottish officers walking in town.

Equipment: 14 studio cars, 8 busses, 16 camera and equipment trucks, 4 elephants (Main elephant Anna May was 30 years old and played in more movies than Clark Gable!) 8 camels, 1 water buffalo and other small animals. 

Use your mouse to roll-over the pictures below to see Then & Now!

Ruiz Hill 3 36 35 52.908 N 118 5 49 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - RUiz Hill Battle Scene

 
   
   
 Ruiz Hill 1 36 35 51.21 N 118 5 52 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - RUiz Hill Battle Scene


 

 Ruiz Hill 3 36 35 52.908 N 118 5 49 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - RUiz Hill Battle Scene

 
 Bridge 4 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Bridge
 
 Temple 1 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - Temple #1
 
Temple 4 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Temple #4
 

 Temple 7.72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - Temple #7

 
 Temple 8 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - Temple #8
 

 
Tent City 1 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - Tent City #1

 
 Tent city 2 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - Tent City #2
 
   
 Fairbanks Gatling Gun 36 39 372 N 118 7 42 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Fairbanks & Gatling Gun
 
 Tantrapur 2 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #1
 
Tantrapur 2 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #2


Tantrapur 3 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #3

 
Temple 4 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #4
 

Tantrapur 5 72 dpi

GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #5

 
Tantrapur 6 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Tantrapur #6
 
Fort 4 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - FORT #4
 
Fort 5 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN  - Fort #5
 
 Fort 6 72 dpi
GUNGA DIN - Fort #6
 
   

 

Round Up TEST A

The Round Up Poster 72 DpiHistorical Note: First film shot in Lone Pine

Year: 1920 (SILENT)
Directed by: Director: George Melford   Jesse Lasky 
Produced by: 
Paramount Pictures (as Famous Players-Lasky Corporation
Starring: Fatty Arbuckle, Mabel Julienne Scott & Wallace Beery

Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle is the star of this film, his first for early pioneer Director, Jesse Lasky. He plays “Slim” Hoover, the sheriff of a small Arizona town, who cannot get a break with the ladies.

Available in Library Archives:

When “The Round-Up " came to Inyo County by Chris Langley
The Round Up was Lone Pine's first movie. Shot entirely in the Alabama Hills at the Cuffe Ranch that was owned
by Clarence Badger, an early American filmmaker and friend of Arbuckles. Langley writes an extensive article on the relationship of Arbuckle early film making in Lone Pine and Badger's love of the area.

Joy Anderson presents Film Museum with Fatty Arbuckle belt from "The Round-Up" 

Museum Document" Fatty Arbuckles life and films.

Museum document:  The Round Up.

Exhibit features costumes worn by Arcbuckle during his days with Keystone Studios,  need more info..................

 

or  as an option - direct people to .... and not have these links appear on this page. Page would end up with info on the exhibit and what they can expect to see,,,,,,,,,,,

For further information on Fatty Arbcukle and the Round Up, please go to the Museum's Library Archives to search for expanded information .

CONCERT IN THE ROCKS 2018

THE MUSEUM OF WESTERN FILM HISTORY
PRESENTS ITS ANNUAL
CONCERT IN THE ROCKS
SATURDAY JUNE 2, 2018
Group from web

A TRIBUTE TO FRANK SINATRA
Featuring

Matt Mauser & The Pete Jacobs Orchestra

Enjoy an evening like no other… A collaboration between Matt Mauser and the Pete Jacobs Orchestra that captures Sinatra’s talent at the height of his career when singing with The Count Basie Orchestra at The Sands hotel in Las Vegas.

Matt SingingMatt’s vocal style and Pete’s genius as a conductor are a tribute to the two greats coming together. While there are plenty of tribute acts and impersonators of legendary entertainer Frank Sinatra, Mauser takes it to a level beyond. His golden voice recreates the Sinatra magic with his impeccable phrasing and smooth ring-a-ding-ding style. 

For Frank Sinatra fans, Matt Mauser is absolutely uncanny. The show, incorporates true-to-form songs once crafted and branded by Ol’ Blue Eyes, himself. Additionally, Matt and band will be tossing in a few modern rock and R&B classics that Matt says he’s sure Sinatra would have loved singing.

The evening will take you down memory lane… with a marvelous rundown of Sinatra songs including "Come Fly With Me," "Luck be a Lady" (first as Brando sang it in "Guys and Dolls"), "The Best is Yet to Come," "The Way You Look Tonight," "Fly Me to the Moon," "Night and Day," "The Lady is a Tramp," "You Make me Feel so Young," and "I've Got You Under my Skin" and of course Ol’ Blue Eyes classic - New York New York.

REVIEWS: from recent Concert goers...
"The House Was Rockin' "
"Multi-Generation Appeal"
"Close your Eyes and you'll Think it's Sinatra"
"Sinatra Was in the House Tonight"

 

CONCERT IN THE ROCKS

Saturday  June 2th, 2018

Rex_on_Stage_06_02_2013_RWS_200 Piano_2 Dinner_2__200JG    
Rex_on_Stage_3__06_02_2013_RWS200 Piano_1 Stage_PP_200      


Collage_72_dpi_600_x

Every June, the magnificent Lone Ranger Canyon, located in the Alabama Hills, is transformed into an “under the stars” venue for hosting the annual Lone Pine – “Concert in the Rocks”. The evening begins with a welcoming reception in the museum for annual members. Following the reception, members and other attendees are transported to the Alabama Hills for a "Cowboy Ranch" dinner preceding the show. 


When the entertainment starts, the evening sky is displaying early stars and the setting sun’s shadows are long on the canyon floor as the discreetly hidden lights create unique and mysterious shadows on the canyon walls. 
 

SCHEDULE:
boot_ImageCocktail Reception for Museum of Western Film History Members 4:30 PM

boot_ImageShuttle bus starts at 5.00 PM from the museum. (members and other attendees)

boot_ImageSit down dinner begins at 6:00 PM (Vegetarian Option Available)

SPONSORS
Alabama Hills Cafe
BLM Logo
Bonanza
 
Boulder_Creek_Rv
Coca Cola
Comfort_Inn
Coso Logo 4 x
Dow Villa
 
Josephs
Lees Frontier
Merry Go Round
 McDonalds
Mt. Whitney Restaurant
Pizza Factory
 
Sierra Storage
 Totem Cafe 1
 
 

boot_ImagePay bar (wine, beer, spirits)
  Tickets available at the Museum

boot_ImageWater and soft drinks provided

boot_ImageConcert commences at dusk


 
boot_ImageReturn shuttle around 10:00 PM after the concert ends

CONCERT AND DINNER IN THE ALABAMA HILLS

PLEASE NOTE

Transportation to the Canyon IS ONLY by bus service.
Buses will leave the Museum for Lone Ranger Canyon at 5:00 PM.

The entry to Lone Ranger Canyon will be roped off providing entry ONLY to buses.

 TICKETS
ON SALE STARTING

FEBRUARY 19, 2018

SOLD OUT
REGULAR DINNER SEATS
$90.00 Per Person

______________________________________________________

 CALL MUSEUM FOR TICKETS

760-876-9103

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Please note: Concert Ticket purchases are FINAL. There are NO refunds

BRING YOUR DANCIN' SHOES
Concert Rocks 2015 Dancing 72 DPI 

Staying the Night
Check out our Visitor Guide links for Local Motels
Best_WesternComfort_InnDow_VillaBoulder_Creek_Rv

History of Lone Ranger Canyon

While details differ, the basic story of the origin of the Lone Ranger is the same in most versions of the franchise. Six Texas Rangers are drawn into a remote canyon and ambushed by a band of outlaws led by Bartholomew "Butch" Cavendish. All are left for dead.

Later, a young Indian named Tonto stumbles on the scene and recognizes the lone survivor, Ranger Reid (whose first name was never given), as the man who had saved his life at some time in the past. He nurses Reid back to health after digging six graves for Reid's comrades, so that Cavendish will think there were no survivors, forgetting that Cavendish thought he had killed seven men in that canyon, including the traitorous scout who led the Rangers into the trap. Among them is Reid's brother, Captain Daniel Reid, who is a Captain of the Texas Rangers. Tonto fashions a black Domino mask using material from Captain Reid's vest to conceal the Lone Ranger's identity. Even after the Cavendish gang is brought to justice, Reid continues to fight for law and order against evil and crime under the guise of the Lone Ranger.

Yes, Kimosabes, that ambush happened in The Alabama Hills near Lone Pine, California, in what is now called Lone Ranger Canyon. Each year, the Lone Pine community and Lone Pine Film History Museum pay tribute to the heritage of the canyon’s history by transforming the dramatic canyon into a magical entertainment venue under the Eastern Sierra stars.

AMERICAN ICON QUILT RAFFLE 

TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT MUSEUM
WInner to be pulled at intermission at Concert

CLICK IMAGE

American Icon Web Pic 

Directions

Contact Info

The Museum of Western Film History
701 S. Main Street
Lone Pine, CA 93545
760-876-9909